Perceptions of medical students and their supervisors of the preparation of students for clinical placement in obstetrics and gynecology

Patricia Johnson, Patricia Green, Peter Jones, Heather James

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Research is limited regarding the adequacy of preparation of medical students for their placement in obstetrics and gynecology. The aim of this study was to determine the perceptions of a cohort of undergraduate medical students from an Australian university and their clinical supervisors of the on-campus preparation of students for their clinical rotation in obstetrics and gynecology. Methods: We used a descriptive exploratory qualitative research approach and purposive sampling to address the aim of the study. Ten undergraduate medical students and 4 of their supervisors participated in the study. Data were collected from focus group discussions, follow-up interviews, and individual semistructured interviews. Interview transcripts were analyzed using an inductive coding approach. Results: Students and their clinical supervisors who participated in the study agreed that students should be as well prepared as possible by the university prior to their placement in obstetrics and gynecology because adequate preparation would provide a solid clinical framework upon which the discipline's knowledge and skills could be built. Overall, participants considered that the on-campus preparation was adequate in many aspects; however, they identified some specific areas in which preparation could be enhanced. These preparation enhancements included specific skills related to examining pregnant women, interpreting cardiotocography, conversing with patients and their families, and improving students' understanding of the hospital culture. Conclusion: These findings provide an increased understanding of the factors a cohort of medical students and their clinical supervisors consider essential for student preparation for the clinical rotation in obstetrics and gynecology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)348-353
Number of pages6
JournalOchsner Journal
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

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Gynecology
Medical Students
Obstetrics
Students
Interviews
Cardiotocography
Qualitative Research
Focus Groups
Pregnant Women
Research

Cite this

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title = "Perceptions of medical students and their supervisors of the preparation of students for clinical placement in obstetrics and gynecology",
abstract = "Background: Research is limited regarding the adequacy of preparation of medical students for their placement in obstetrics and gynecology. The aim of this study was to determine the perceptions of a cohort of undergraduate medical students from an Australian university and their clinical supervisors of the on-campus preparation of students for their clinical rotation in obstetrics and gynecology. Methods: We used a descriptive exploratory qualitative research approach and purposive sampling to address the aim of the study. Ten undergraduate medical students and 4 of their supervisors participated in the study. Data were collected from focus group discussions, follow-up interviews, and individual semistructured interviews. Interview transcripts were analyzed using an inductive coding approach. Results: Students and their clinical supervisors who participated in the study agreed that students should be as well prepared as possible by the university prior to their placement in obstetrics and gynecology because adequate preparation would provide a solid clinical framework upon which the discipline's knowledge and skills could be built. Overall, participants considered that the on-campus preparation was adequate in many aspects; however, they identified some specific areas in which preparation could be enhanced. These preparation enhancements included specific skills related to examining pregnant women, interpreting cardiotocography, conversing with patients and their families, and improving students' understanding of the hospital culture. Conclusion: These findings provide an increased understanding of the factors a cohort of medical students and their clinical supervisors consider essential for student preparation for the clinical rotation in obstetrics and gynecology.",
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Perceptions of medical students and their supervisors of the preparation of students for clinical placement in obstetrics and gynecology. / Johnson, Patricia; Green, Patricia; Jones, Peter; James, Heather.

In: Ochsner Journal, Vol. 12, No. 4, 12.2012, p. 348-353.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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