Percentile ranks of physical fitness levels for female law enforcement recruits in the USA

Erika Hernandez, Joe Dulla, Rob Marc Orr, Jay Dawes, Charles Kornhauser, Robert G. Lockie

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Law enforcement agencies (LEAs) throughout the USA have varying physical fitness requirements which must be met before
a recruit may join their respective law enforcement academy. It is expected that law enforcement officer (LEO) recruits will obtain an
adequate level of physical fitness before they start academy training. When looking at the effect of sex on physical fitness, female recruits
generally present with lower strength, endurance, and aerobic fitness when compared to male recruits. However, differences in physical
fitness levels between female LEO recruits is less well known with law enforcement research tending to feature low female sample sizes. More
detailed analyses of female LEO recruits is required.

PURPOSE: To detail the percentile ranks of female LEO recruits’ physical fitness
performance in the number of push-ups (PU), sit-ups (SU), multi-stage fitness test (MSFT) shuttles completed, and maximal aerobic capacity
(VO2max).

METHODS: Retrospective analysis on females from 14 LEO recruit classes from LEAs in different American states was conducted.
Although there may be some variation in fitness between states, data was combined to provide an overview of higher and lower standards
specific to female recruits. All females were tested prior to their respective LEA training academy and all available data were used. Maximum
numbers of PU and SU in 60 s were recorded. VO2max was derived from MSFT shuttles completed. Percentile rankings were calculated using
Microsoft Excel’s “Rank and Percentile” tool within the Data Analysis ToolPak.

RESULTS: Percentile rankings are shown in Table 1. Female
recruits with 43-61 PU were in the 90th percentile, those with 27-29 were in the 50th percentile, and those with 1-14 were in the 10th
percentile. Recruits with 45-76 SU were in the 90th percentile, those with 34-35 were in the 50th percentile, and those with 5-23 were in 10th
percentile. Recruits with 67-100 MSFT shuttles were in the 90th percentile, those with 42-45 shuttles were in the 50th percentile, and those
with 8-26 shuttles were in the 10th percentile. Recruits with a VO2max of 42.1-50.2 ml/kg/min were in the 90th percentile, those with 33.1-
34.4 ml/kg/min were in the 50th percentile, and those with 26.1-27.5 ml/kg/min were in the 10th percentile.

CONCLUSIONS: The data
presented here details characteristics of typical female LEO recruits from the USA. When compared to normative data from ACSM, female
recruits tended to score superior or similar to general population norms in PU and SU, and tended to perform poorer in aerobic capacity. LEA
training staff can use this data to profile their female recruits and highlight strengths and areas for improvement.

PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS:
Female LEO recruits should strive to better their aerobic capacity to better match normative VO2max values in women. By doing so, and
further developing strength, power, and endurance, females will be more prepared to complete academy training, perform job-specific tasks,
and raise the expectations and overall fitness for females as a sex group.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jul 2019
Event42nd National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) National Conference and Exhibition - Washington Marriott Wardman Park, Washington DC, United States
Duration: 10 Jul 201913 Jul 2019

Conference

Conference42nd National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) National Conference and Exhibition
Abbreviated titleNSCA
CountryUnited States
CityWashington DC
Period10/07/1913/07/19
OtherNational Strength and Conditioning Association National Conference National Strength and Conditioning Association National Conference. The NSCA advances the profession by supporting strength and conditioning professionals devoted to helping others discover and maximize their strengths. We disseminate research-based knowledge and its practical application by offering industry-leading certifications, research journals, career development services, and continuing education opportunities.

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Law Enforcement
Physical Fitness
Police
Sample Size

Cite this

Hernandez, E., Dulla, J., Orr, R. M., Dawes, J., Kornhauser, C., & Lockie, R. G. (2019). Percentile ranks of physical fitness levels for female law enforcement recruits in the USA. Poster session presented at 42nd National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) National Conference and Exhibition, Washington DC, United States.
Hernandez, Erika ; Dulla, Joe ; Orr, Rob Marc ; Dawes, Jay ; Kornhauser, Charles ; Lockie, Robert G. / Percentile ranks of physical fitness levels for female law enforcement recruits in the USA. Poster session presented at 42nd National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) National Conference and Exhibition, Washington DC, United States.
@conference{38f7136b131d45c98c4b63d576c3bdf9,
title = "Percentile ranks of physical fitness levels for female law enforcement recruits in the USA",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: Law enforcement agencies (LEAs) throughout the USA have varying physical fitness requirements which must be met beforea recruit may join their respective law enforcement academy. It is expected that law enforcement officer (LEO) recruits will obtain anadequate level of physical fitness before they start academy training. When looking at the effect of sex on physical fitness, female recruitsgenerally present with lower strength, endurance, and aerobic fitness when compared to male recruits. However, differences in physicalfitness levels between female LEO recruits is less well known with law enforcement research tending to feature low female sample sizes. Moredetailed analyses of female LEO recruits is required. PURPOSE: To detail the percentile ranks of female LEO recruits’ physical fitnessperformance in the number of push-ups (PU), sit-ups (SU), multi-stage fitness test (MSFT) shuttles completed, and maximal aerobic capacity(VO2max). METHODS: Retrospective analysis on females from 14 LEO recruit classes from LEAs in different American states was conducted.Although there may be some variation in fitness between states, data was combined to provide an overview of higher and lower standardsspecific to female recruits. All females were tested prior to their respective LEA training academy and all available data were used. Maximumnumbers of PU and SU in 60 s were recorded. VO2max was derived from MSFT shuttles completed. Percentile rankings were calculated usingMicrosoft Excel’s “Rank and Percentile” tool within the Data Analysis ToolPak. RESULTS: Percentile rankings are shown in Table 1. Femalerecruits with 43-61 PU were in the 90th percentile, those with 27-29 were in the 50th percentile, and those with 1-14 were in the 10thpercentile. Recruits with 45-76 SU were in the 90th percentile, those with 34-35 were in the 50th percentile, and those with 5-23 were in 10thpercentile. Recruits with 67-100 MSFT shuttles were in the 90th percentile, those with 42-45 shuttles were in the 50th percentile, and thosewith 8-26 shuttles were in the 10th percentile. Recruits with a VO2max of 42.1-50.2 ml/kg/min were in the 90th percentile, those with 33.1-34.4 ml/kg/min were in the 50th percentile, and those with 26.1-27.5 ml/kg/min were in the 10th percentile. CONCLUSIONS: The datapresented here details characteristics of typical female LEO recruits from the USA. When compared to normative data from ACSM, femalerecruits tended to score superior or similar to general population norms in PU and SU, and tended to perform poorer in aerobic capacity. LEAtraining staff can use this data to profile their female recruits and highlight strengths and areas for improvement. PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS:Female LEO recruits should strive to better their aerobic capacity to better match normative VO2max values in women. By doing so, andfurther developing strength, power, and endurance, females will be more prepared to complete academy training, perform job-specific tasks,and raise the expectations and overall fitness for females as a sex group.",
author = "Erika Hernandez and Joe Dulla and Orr, {Rob Marc} and Jay Dawes and Charles Kornhauser and Lockie, {Robert G.}",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "10",
language = "English",
note = "42nd National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) National Conference and Exhibition, NSCA ; Conference date: 10-07-2019 Through 13-07-2019",

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Hernandez, E, Dulla, J, Orr, RM, Dawes, J, Kornhauser, C & Lockie, RG 2019, 'Percentile ranks of physical fitness levels for female law enforcement recruits in the USA' 42nd National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) National Conference and Exhibition, Washington DC, United States, 10/07/19 - 13/07/19, .

Percentile ranks of physical fitness levels for female law enforcement recruits in the USA. / Hernandez, Erika; Dulla, Joe; Orr, Rob Marc; Dawes, Jay; Kornhauser, Charles; Lockie, Robert G.

2019. Poster session presented at 42nd National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) National Conference and Exhibition, Washington DC, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Percentile ranks of physical fitness levels for female law enforcement recruits in the USA

AU - Hernandez, Erika

AU - Dulla, Joe

AU - Orr, Rob Marc

AU - Dawes, Jay

AU - Kornhauser, Charles

AU - Lockie, Robert G.

PY - 2019/7/10

Y1 - 2019/7/10

N2 - INTRODUCTION: Law enforcement agencies (LEAs) throughout the USA have varying physical fitness requirements which must be met beforea recruit may join their respective law enforcement academy. It is expected that law enforcement officer (LEO) recruits will obtain anadequate level of physical fitness before they start academy training. When looking at the effect of sex on physical fitness, female recruitsgenerally present with lower strength, endurance, and aerobic fitness when compared to male recruits. However, differences in physicalfitness levels between female LEO recruits is less well known with law enforcement research tending to feature low female sample sizes. Moredetailed analyses of female LEO recruits is required. PURPOSE: To detail the percentile ranks of female LEO recruits’ physical fitnessperformance in the number of push-ups (PU), sit-ups (SU), multi-stage fitness test (MSFT) shuttles completed, and maximal aerobic capacity(VO2max). METHODS: Retrospective analysis on females from 14 LEO recruit classes from LEAs in different American states was conducted.Although there may be some variation in fitness between states, data was combined to provide an overview of higher and lower standardsspecific to female recruits. All females were tested prior to their respective LEA training academy and all available data were used. Maximumnumbers of PU and SU in 60 s were recorded. VO2max was derived from MSFT shuttles completed. Percentile rankings were calculated usingMicrosoft Excel’s “Rank and Percentile” tool within the Data Analysis ToolPak. RESULTS: Percentile rankings are shown in Table 1. Femalerecruits with 43-61 PU were in the 90th percentile, those with 27-29 were in the 50th percentile, and those with 1-14 were in the 10thpercentile. Recruits with 45-76 SU were in the 90th percentile, those with 34-35 were in the 50th percentile, and those with 5-23 were in 10thpercentile. Recruits with 67-100 MSFT shuttles were in the 90th percentile, those with 42-45 shuttles were in the 50th percentile, and thosewith 8-26 shuttles were in the 10th percentile. Recruits with a VO2max of 42.1-50.2 ml/kg/min were in the 90th percentile, those with 33.1-34.4 ml/kg/min were in the 50th percentile, and those with 26.1-27.5 ml/kg/min were in the 10th percentile. CONCLUSIONS: The datapresented here details characteristics of typical female LEO recruits from the USA. When compared to normative data from ACSM, femalerecruits tended to score superior or similar to general population norms in PU and SU, and tended to perform poorer in aerobic capacity. LEAtraining staff can use this data to profile their female recruits and highlight strengths and areas for improvement. PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS:Female LEO recruits should strive to better their aerobic capacity to better match normative VO2max values in women. By doing so, andfurther developing strength, power, and endurance, females will be more prepared to complete academy training, perform job-specific tasks,and raise the expectations and overall fitness for females as a sex group.

AB - INTRODUCTION: Law enforcement agencies (LEAs) throughout the USA have varying physical fitness requirements which must be met beforea recruit may join their respective law enforcement academy. It is expected that law enforcement officer (LEO) recruits will obtain anadequate level of physical fitness before they start academy training. When looking at the effect of sex on physical fitness, female recruitsgenerally present with lower strength, endurance, and aerobic fitness when compared to male recruits. However, differences in physicalfitness levels between female LEO recruits is less well known with law enforcement research tending to feature low female sample sizes. Moredetailed analyses of female LEO recruits is required. PURPOSE: To detail the percentile ranks of female LEO recruits’ physical fitnessperformance in the number of push-ups (PU), sit-ups (SU), multi-stage fitness test (MSFT) shuttles completed, and maximal aerobic capacity(VO2max). METHODS: Retrospective analysis on females from 14 LEO recruit classes from LEAs in different American states was conducted.Although there may be some variation in fitness between states, data was combined to provide an overview of higher and lower standardsspecific to female recruits. All females were tested prior to their respective LEA training academy and all available data were used. Maximumnumbers of PU and SU in 60 s were recorded. VO2max was derived from MSFT shuttles completed. Percentile rankings were calculated usingMicrosoft Excel’s “Rank and Percentile” tool within the Data Analysis ToolPak. RESULTS: Percentile rankings are shown in Table 1. Femalerecruits with 43-61 PU were in the 90th percentile, those with 27-29 were in the 50th percentile, and those with 1-14 were in the 10thpercentile. Recruits with 45-76 SU were in the 90th percentile, those with 34-35 were in the 50th percentile, and those with 5-23 were in 10thpercentile. Recruits with 67-100 MSFT shuttles were in the 90th percentile, those with 42-45 shuttles were in the 50th percentile, and thosewith 8-26 shuttles were in the 10th percentile. Recruits with a VO2max of 42.1-50.2 ml/kg/min were in the 90th percentile, those with 33.1-34.4 ml/kg/min were in the 50th percentile, and those with 26.1-27.5 ml/kg/min were in the 10th percentile. CONCLUSIONS: The datapresented here details characteristics of typical female LEO recruits from the USA. When compared to normative data from ACSM, femalerecruits tended to score superior or similar to general population norms in PU and SU, and tended to perform poorer in aerobic capacity. LEAtraining staff can use this data to profile their female recruits and highlight strengths and areas for improvement. PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS:Female LEO recruits should strive to better their aerobic capacity to better match normative VO2max values in women. By doing so, andfurther developing strength, power, and endurance, females will be more prepared to complete academy training, perform job-specific tasks,and raise the expectations and overall fitness for females as a sex group.

M3 - Poster

ER -

Hernandez E, Dulla J, Orr RM, Dawes J, Kornhauser C, Lockie RG. Percentile ranks of physical fitness levels for female law enforcement recruits in the USA. 2019. Poster session presented at 42nd National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) National Conference and Exhibition, Washington DC, United States.