Perceived vs. Actual Reported Peace Officer Physical Job Demands: What Three Points in Time Tell Us

Joseph Dulla, James Dawes, Joseph Horrigan, Rob Marc Orr, Robert G. Lockie

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterResearch

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Abstract

A common perception among incumbents and some trainers is that muscular endurance
and aerobic capacity are the most prevalent and important components of occupational
fitness as they relate to the regular tasks of California Peace Officers assigned to daily
patrol duties. The purpose of this study was to review job demand studies, and present
the most recent data from a job task analysis for peace officers in California. In 1983, the
California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training conducted a statewide
physical job task-demands study. The data of 1,625 officers showed that the underlying
fitness components of agility, anaerobic capacity, anaerobic power, and strength were
more predominant in daily peace officer tasks than muscular endurance and aerobic
capacity. As a result, a five event Work Sample Test Battery (WSTB) was developed and
validated. With the exception of a 500-yard run, the other four WSTB events (99-yard
obstacle course, chain link fence climb, solid wall climb, dummy drag) assessed
components of agility, strength, power, and anaerobic capacity. In a 2008-2010 survey of
Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Deputies assigned to patrol duties, components of fitness
reported as important by Deputies (n=162) were: 15% strength; 15% muscular
endurance; 13% power; 13% anaerobic power; 12% trunk strength; 11% equilibrium; 11%
flexibility; and 10% aerobic capacity. An even larger 2018 statewide survey of California
peace officers assigned to patrol duties (question responders = 2,874-3,937) provided the
following data pertaining to components of fitness required for patrol officer tasks: 17.9%
stability; 14.4% flexibility; 13.3% power; 13.3% agility; 12.3% anaerobic capacity; 10.3%
muscular strength; 8.25% muscular endurance; 5.6% balance; and 4.6% aerobic capacity.
Taken together, the results from these large-scale job demand studies indicate the
reported importance by those assigned to patrol duties of anaerobic qualities (e.g.
strength and power). Training programs used to develop future peace officers that are
weighted toward muscular endurance and aerobic capacity may limit the adaptive
responses actually required officers. To increase effectiveness and optimize job-relevant
in the day-to-day physical tasks of patrol performance, physical training programming
should more closely target and reflect the actual components of fitness of stability,
power, agility, muscular strength, muscular endurance, balance, and aerobic capacity
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2018
EventThe 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine - Costa Mesa Hilton, Costa Mesa, United States
Duration: 26 Oct 201827 Oct 2018
Conference number: 38th
https://www.acsm.org/acsm-membership/regional-chapters/acsm-chapters/southwest/southwest-l2

Conference

ConferenceThe 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine
Abbreviated titleSWACSM
CountryUnited States
CityCosta Mesa
Period26/10/1827/10/18
Internet address

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job demand
peace
endurance
test battery
fitness
job task analysis
flexibility
time
event
training program

Cite this

Dulla, J., Dawes, J., Horrigan, J., Orr, R. M., & Lockie, R. G. (2018). Perceived vs. Actual Reported Peace Officer Physical Job Demands: What Three Points in Time Tell Us. Poster session presented at The 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States.
Dulla, Joseph ; Dawes, James ; Horrigan, Joseph ; Orr, Rob Marc ; Lockie, Robert G. / Perceived vs. Actual Reported Peace Officer Physical Job Demands: What Three Points in Time Tell Us. Poster session presented at The 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States.
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abstract = "A common perception among incumbents and some trainers is that muscular enduranceand aerobic capacity are the most prevalent and important components of occupationalfitness as they relate to the regular tasks of California Peace Officers assigned to dailypatrol duties. The purpose of this study was to review job demand studies, and presentthe most recent data from a job task analysis for peace officers in California. In 1983, theCalifornia Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training conducted a statewidephysical job task-demands study. The data of 1,625 officers showed that the underlyingfitness components of agility, anaerobic capacity, anaerobic power, and strength weremore predominant in daily peace officer tasks than muscular endurance and aerobiccapacity. As a result, a five event Work Sample Test Battery (WSTB) was developed andvalidated. With the exception of a 500-yard run, the other four WSTB events (99-yardobstacle course, chain link fence climb, solid wall climb, dummy drag) assessedcomponents of agility, strength, power, and anaerobic capacity. In a 2008-2010 survey ofLos Angeles County Sheriff’s Deputies assigned to patrol duties, components of fitnessreported as important by Deputies (n=162) were: 15{\%} strength; 15{\%} muscularendurance; 13{\%} power; 13{\%} anaerobic power; 12{\%} trunk strength; 11{\%} equilibrium; 11{\%}flexibility; and 10{\%} aerobic capacity. An even larger 2018 statewide survey of Californiapeace officers assigned to patrol duties (question responders = 2,874-3,937) provided thefollowing data pertaining to components of fitness required for patrol officer tasks: 17.9{\%}stability; 14.4{\%} flexibility; 13.3{\%} power; 13.3{\%} agility; 12.3{\%} anaerobic capacity; 10.3{\%}muscular strength; 8.25{\%} muscular endurance; 5.6{\%} balance; and 4.6{\%} aerobic capacity.Taken together, the results from these large-scale job demand studies indicate thereported importance by those assigned to patrol duties of anaerobic qualities (e.g.strength and power). Training programs used to develop future peace officers that areweighted toward muscular endurance and aerobic capacity may limit the adaptiveresponses actually required officers. To increase effectiveness and optimize job-relevantin the day-to-day physical tasks of patrol performance, physical training programmingshould more closely target and reflect the actual components of fitness of stability,power, agility, muscular strength, muscular endurance, balance, and aerobic capacity",
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Dulla, J, Dawes, J, Horrigan, J, Orr, RM & Lockie, RG 2018, 'Perceived vs. Actual Reported Peace Officer Physical Job Demands: What Three Points in Time Tell Us' The 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States, 26/10/18 - 27/10/18, .

Perceived vs. Actual Reported Peace Officer Physical Job Demands: What Three Points in Time Tell Us. / Dulla, Joseph; Dawes, James; Horrigan, Joseph ; Orr, Rob Marc; Lockie, Robert G.

2018. Poster session presented at The 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterResearch

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T1 - Perceived vs. Actual Reported Peace Officer Physical Job Demands: What Three Points in Time Tell Us

AU - Dulla, Joseph

AU - Dawes, James

AU - Horrigan, Joseph

AU - Orr, Rob Marc

AU - Lockie, Robert G.

PY - 2018/10

Y1 - 2018/10

N2 - A common perception among incumbents and some trainers is that muscular enduranceand aerobic capacity are the most prevalent and important components of occupationalfitness as they relate to the regular tasks of California Peace Officers assigned to dailypatrol duties. The purpose of this study was to review job demand studies, and presentthe most recent data from a job task analysis for peace officers in California. In 1983, theCalifornia Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training conducted a statewidephysical job task-demands study. The data of 1,625 officers showed that the underlyingfitness components of agility, anaerobic capacity, anaerobic power, and strength weremore predominant in daily peace officer tasks than muscular endurance and aerobiccapacity. As a result, a five event Work Sample Test Battery (WSTB) was developed andvalidated. With the exception of a 500-yard run, the other four WSTB events (99-yardobstacle course, chain link fence climb, solid wall climb, dummy drag) assessedcomponents of agility, strength, power, and anaerobic capacity. In a 2008-2010 survey ofLos Angeles County Sheriff’s Deputies assigned to patrol duties, components of fitnessreported as important by Deputies (n=162) were: 15% strength; 15% muscularendurance; 13% power; 13% anaerobic power; 12% trunk strength; 11% equilibrium; 11%flexibility; and 10% aerobic capacity. An even larger 2018 statewide survey of Californiapeace officers assigned to patrol duties (question responders = 2,874-3,937) provided thefollowing data pertaining to components of fitness required for patrol officer tasks: 17.9%stability; 14.4% flexibility; 13.3% power; 13.3% agility; 12.3% anaerobic capacity; 10.3%muscular strength; 8.25% muscular endurance; 5.6% balance; and 4.6% aerobic capacity.Taken together, the results from these large-scale job demand studies indicate thereported importance by those assigned to patrol duties of anaerobic qualities (e.g.strength and power). Training programs used to develop future peace officers that areweighted toward muscular endurance and aerobic capacity may limit the adaptiveresponses actually required officers. To increase effectiveness and optimize job-relevantin the day-to-day physical tasks of patrol performance, physical training programmingshould more closely target and reflect the actual components of fitness of stability,power, agility, muscular strength, muscular endurance, balance, and aerobic capacity

AB - A common perception among incumbents and some trainers is that muscular enduranceand aerobic capacity are the most prevalent and important components of occupationalfitness as they relate to the regular tasks of California Peace Officers assigned to dailypatrol duties. The purpose of this study was to review job demand studies, and presentthe most recent data from a job task analysis for peace officers in California. In 1983, theCalifornia Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training conducted a statewidephysical job task-demands study. The data of 1,625 officers showed that the underlyingfitness components of agility, anaerobic capacity, anaerobic power, and strength weremore predominant in daily peace officer tasks than muscular endurance and aerobiccapacity. As a result, a five event Work Sample Test Battery (WSTB) was developed andvalidated. With the exception of a 500-yard run, the other four WSTB events (99-yardobstacle course, chain link fence climb, solid wall climb, dummy drag) assessedcomponents of agility, strength, power, and anaerobic capacity. In a 2008-2010 survey ofLos Angeles County Sheriff’s Deputies assigned to patrol duties, components of fitnessreported as important by Deputies (n=162) were: 15% strength; 15% muscularendurance; 13% power; 13% anaerobic power; 12% trunk strength; 11% equilibrium; 11%flexibility; and 10% aerobic capacity. An even larger 2018 statewide survey of Californiapeace officers assigned to patrol duties (question responders = 2,874-3,937) provided thefollowing data pertaining to components of fitness required for patrol officer tasks: 17.9%stability; 14.4% flexibility; 13.3% power; 13.3% agility; 12.3% anaerobic capacity; 10.3%muscular strength; 8.25% muscular endurance; 5.6% balance; and 4.6% aerobic capacity.Taken together, the results from these large-scale job demand studies indicate thereported importance by those assigned to patrol duties of anaerobic qualities (e.g.strength and power). Training programs used to develop future peace officers that areweighted toward muscular endurance and aerobic capacity may limit the adaptiveresponses actually required officers. To increase effectiveness and optimize job-relevantin the day-to-day physical tasks of patrol performance, physical training programmingshould more closely target and reflect the actual components of fitness of stability,power, agility, muscular strength, muscular endurance, balance, and aerobic capacity

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M3 - Poster

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Dulla J, Dawes J, Horrigan J, Orr RM, Lockie RG. Perceived vs. Actual Reported Peace Officer Physical Job Demands: What Three Points in Time Tell Us. 2018. Poster session presented at The 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States.