Perceived conditions of workers in different organizational settings

Craig Ashley Langston, Yu Song, Brian Purdey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract


Purpose
– Research into office design and its effect on employee satisfaction and performance has attracted considerable contemporary research interest. However, most studies have tended to concentrate on the impact of the built environment on human performance, ignoring the actual needs of employees working in different organizational settings. This paper hence aims to investigate the nature and extent of occupant satisfaction with the built environment in different organizational settings in Australia for a range of climates.

Design/methodology/approach
– A survey was conducted in Australia from 2004‐2005, comprising 41 buildings, including six government buildings, 14 educational buildings and 21 commercial buildings. The Kruskal‐Wallis H test was used to explore whether there are differences in the mean ranking of office environment satisfaction amongst the three organizational settings, and the Mann‐Whitney U test was employed to further test whether there are differences in the mean ranking of office environment satisfaction between any two groups.

Findings
– Significant differences were found in aspects of air, temperature, space suitability, flexibility, usability and controllability. Employees in commercial settings seem to be more satisfied with their physical work environment than employees in other organization types. Employees in educational settings showed the highest satisfaction with most variables in the workspace design and management category. Government employees showed a lower level of satisfaction with their physical work environment and workspace design and management.

Originality/value
– Moreover, the government and educational groups showed more similarity with each other, while the commercial group displayed significant difference.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)54-67
Number of pages14
JournalFacilities
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

employee
Personnel
worker
building
work environment
ranking
research interest
Group
educational setting
Controllability
management
performance
flexibility
air
climate
organization
methodology
Air
Values
Temperature

Cite this

Langston, Craig Ashley ; Song, Yu ; Purdey, Brian. / Perceived conditions of workers in different organizational settings. In: Facilities. 2008 ; Vol. 26, No. 1. pp. 54-67.
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Perceived conditions of workers in different organizational settings. / Langston, Craig Ashley; Song, Yu; Purdey, Brian.

In: Facilities, Vol. 26, No. 1, 2008, p. 54-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AB - Purpose– Research into office design and its effect on employee satisfaction and performance has attracted considerable contemporary research interest. However, most studies have tended to concentrate on the impact of the built environment on human performance, ignoring the actual needs of employees working in different organizational settings. This paper hence aims to investigate the nature and extent of occupant satisfaction with the built environment in different organizational settings in Australia for a range of climates.Design/methodology/approach– A survey was conducted in Australia from 2004‐2005, comprising 41 buildings, including six government buildings, 14 educational buildings and 21 commercial buildings. The Kruskal‐Wallis H test was used to explore whether there are differences in the mean ranking of office environment satisfaction amongst the three organizational settings, and the Mann‐Whitney U test was employed to further test whether there are differences in the mean ranking of office environment satisfaction between any two groups.Findings– Significant differences were found in aspects of air, temperature, space suitability, flexibility, usability and controllability. Employees in commercial settings seem to be more satisfied with their physical work environment than employees in other organization types. Employees in educational settings showed the highest satisfaction with most variables in the workspace design and management category. Government employees showed a lower level of satisfaction with their physical work environment and workspace design and management.Originality/value– Moreover, the government and educational groups showed more similarity with each other, while the commercial group displayed significant difference.

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