Osteoarthritis: Pathophysiology, Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Exercise for Reducing Pain and Disability

Joseph J Knapik, Rodney Pope, Robin Orr, Ben Schram

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disorder involving deterioration of articular cartilage and underlying bone and is associated with symptoms of pain and disability. The incidence of OA in the military increased over the period 2000 to 2012 and was the first or second leading cause of medical separations in this period. Risk factors for OA include older age, black race, genetics, higher body mass index, prior knee injury, and excessive joint loading. Animal studies indicate that moderate exercise can assist in maintaining normal cartilage, and individuals performing moderate levels of exercise show little evidence of OA. There is considerable evidence that among individuals who develop OA, moderate and regular exercise can reduce pain and disability. There is no firm evidence that any particular mode of exercise (e.g., aerobic training, resistance exercise) is more effective than another for reducing OA-related pain and disability, but limited research suggests that exercise should be lifelong and conducted at least three times per week for optimal effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)94-102
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of special operations medicine : a peer reviewed journal for SOF medical professionals
Volume18
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2018

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Osteoarthritis
Exercise
Pain
Knee Injuries
Resistance Training
Articular Cartilage
Cartilage
Body Mass Index
Joints
Bone and Bones
Incidence
Research

Cite this

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Osteoarthritis : Pathophysiology, Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Exercise for Reducing Pain and Disability. / Knapik, Joseph J; Pope, Rodney; Orr, Robin; Schram, Ben.

In: Journal of special operations medicine : a peer reviewed journal for SOF medical professionals, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01.09.2018, p. 94-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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