Optical properties of poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) film and its potential for a long-term solar ultraviolet dosimeter

R. A. Lester, A. V. Parisi*, M. G. Kimlin, J. Sabburg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The optical properties of poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (PPO) film have been characterized in order to develop an alternative method for UV dosimetry with a focus on long-term human exposure measurements. The dynamic range of PPO film was found to extend to 2 MJ m-2 of broadband UV exposure independently of film thickness, providing an exposure range of roughly four summer days at subtropical latitudes. The sensitivity of the film to UV exposure was positively related to film thickness in the 20-40 μm range. Films of 40 μm thickness proved to be the most suitable for long-term human UV exposure measurements. The temperature independence of the response of 40 μm PPO film was established from 1.5 °C to 50 °C within a dosimeter response uncertainty of 6.5%. Dose-rate independence was also demonstrated within 8% of the mean dosimeter response. The spectral response approximates the CIE erythemal action spectrum between 300 and 340 nm, with a peak response at 305 nm. A large deviation from this action spectrum was observed at shorter wavelengths. Investigation of the angular response in both the azimuth and altitude planes showed a cosine error of less than 6.2% between 0° and 40°, and did not exceed 13.3% at any angle greater than 40°. These results indicate that PPO film satisfies the requirements for use as a UV dosimeter, and may be employed in long-term human exposure measurements.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3685-3698
Number of pages14
JournalPhysics in Medicine and Biology
Volume48
Issue number22
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Nov 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Optical properties of poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) film and its potential for a long-term solar ultraviolet dosimeter'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this