On the neuroscience of approach and withdrawal motivation, with a focus on the role of asymmetrical frontal cortical activity

Douglas Jozef Angus, Eddie Harmon-Jones

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Extensive human and animal research has examined approach and withdrawal motivation, which we define as the simple urge to move toward or away, respectively. In this chapter, we review seminal and recent research that showing that asymmetrical frontal cortical activity underlies approach and withdrawal motivation that occur during childhood, that characterize certain psychopathologies, and are present in everyday emotional experiences. Specifically, greater left-frontal activity is involved in approach motivation, including the expression and experience of anger, jealousy, desire, and joy. Conversely, greater right-frontal activity is involved in withdrawal motivation, including the expression and experience of some forms of sadness, crying, and depressed mood. We also review recent research suggesting that connectivity between the frontal and parietal cortices is a potential mechanism for the motivationrelated effects of asymmetrical frontal activity.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRecent Developments in Neuroscience Research on Human Motivation
EditorsSung-il Kim, Johnmarshall Reeve, Mimi Bong
PublisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited
Pages37-63
Number of pages27
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameAdvances in Motivation and Achievement
PublisherEmerald Group Publishing Ltd.
Volume19
ISSN (Print)0749-7423

Fingerprint

Neurosciences
Motivation
Jealousy
Crying
Parietal Lobe
Anger
Frontal Lobe
Psychopathology
Research

Cite this

Angus, D. J., & Harmon-Jones, E. (2016). On the neuroscience of approach and withdrawal motivation, with a focus on the role of asymmetrical frontal cortical activity. In S. Kim, J. Reeve, & M. Bong (Eds.), Recent Developments in Neuroscience Research on Human Motivation (pp. 37-63). (Advances in Motivation and Achievement; Vol. 19). Emerald Group Publishing Limited. https://doi.org/10.1108/S0749-742320160000019003
Angus, Douglas Jozef ; Harmon-Jones, Eddie. / On the neuroscience of approach and withdrawal motivation, with a focus on the role of asymmetrical frontal cortical activity. Recent Developments in Neuroscience Research on Human Motivation. editor / Sung-il Kim ; Johnmarshall Reeve ; Mimi Bong. Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016. pp. 37-63 (Advances in Motivation and Achievement).
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Angus, DJ & Harmon-Jones, E 2016, On the neuroscience of approach and withdrawal motivation, with a focus on the role of asymmetrical frontal cortical activity. in S Kim, J Reeve & M Bong (eds), Recent Developments in Neuroscience Research on Human Motivation. Advances in Motivation and Achievement, vol. 19, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp. 37-63. https://doi.org/10.1108/S0749-742320160000019003

On the neuroscience of approach and withdrawal motivation, with a focus on the role of asymmetrical frontal cortical activity. / Angus, Douglas Jozef; Harmon-Jones, Eddie.

Recent Developments in Neuroscience Research on Human Motivation. ed. / Sung-il Kim; Johnmarshall Reeve; Mimi Bong. Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016. p. 37-63 (Advances in Motivation and Achievement; Vol. 19).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

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Angus DJ, Harmon-Jones E. On the neuroscience of approach and withdrawal motivation, with a focus on the role of asymmetrical frontal cortical activity. In Kim S, Reeve J, Bong M, editors, Recent Developments in Neuroscience Research on Human Motivation. Emerald Group Publishing Limited. 2016. p. 37-63. (Advances in Motivation and Achievement). https://doi.org/10.1108/S0749-742320160000019003