Occupant Satisfaction and Comfort in Green Buildings: A Longitudinal Occupant Survey in a Green Building in the Subtropical Climate in Australia

Maryam Khoshbakht, Zhonghua Gou, Karine Dupre, Rick Best

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Understanding occupant expectation and feedback is an important part of building performance evaluation. This paper explores occupant satisfaction change during a 10-year period in a green building located in the subtropical zone. Occupant satisfaction at two timestamps, three and ten years after project completion, were compared. It was observed that occupant satisfaction regarding indoor air quality (IAQ), noise and overall building comfort remained unchanged during the 10-year post-occupancy period. This finding suggests that perceived IAQ, noise, and overall satisfaction with buildings may not be biased by point-in-time of surveys, the year weather or sample characteristics. However, satisfaction scores regarding the two parameters of lighting and thermal comfort are likely to be subject to change over time. The change in satisfaction scores in relation to thermal comfort and lighting might be explained in various ways. The change of climate and sky conditions, and different sample characteristics were the two assumptions considered worthy of further investigations. The study found some evidence of a possible correlation between year weather and occupant satisfaction responses. The study also showed that green buildings with natural ventilation may be more susceptible to climate change impacts.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEngaging Architectural Science: Meeting the Challenges of Higher Density
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 52nd International Conference of the Architectural Science Association
EditorsPriyadarsini Rajagopalan, Mary Myla Andamon
Place of PublicationMelbourne
PublisherRMIT University Press
Pages371-381
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)978-0-9923835-5-8
Publication statusPublished - 2018
EventThe 52nd International Conference of the Architectural Science Association (ANZAScA) - RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia
Duration: 28 Nov 20181 Dec 2018
Conference number: 52nd
https://www.asa2018conference.com/
https://www.asa2018conference.com/proceedings (Proceedings & the Book of Abstracts)

Conference

ConferenceThe 52nd International Conference of the Architectural Science Association (ANZAScA)
Abbreviated titleASA2018
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period28/11/181/12/18
OtherThe conference theme of the 52nd International Conference of the Architectural Science Association on Engaging Architectural Science: Meeting the Challenges of Higher Density, emphasises the issue of built environments for growingcities. What is the outlook on urban futures and densification? Cities have been viewed as sustainability problems rather than solutions. As concerns about urban sprawl, densification, shanty towns and climate change grew, so did the awareness for high-performance, energy-efficient building and walkable neighbourhoods make cities liveable and offer far greater benefits for the global environment. For example, high-density living has been viewed as a key strategy to manage urban growth and is increasingly becoming a feature in city planning. By 2030, 60 percent of the world’s population will live in cities (McKinsey & Company, 2013). Australian cities have seen a rapid increase of high-rise residential construction which generates, among others, a discussion on planning controls in inner cities.
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indoor air
air quality
weather
climate
ventilation
climate change
lighting
green building
parameter
project
evaluation

Cite this

Khoshbakht, M., Gou, Z., Dupre, K., & Best, R. (2018). Occupant Satisfaction and Comfort in Green Buildings: A Longitudinal Occupant Survey in a Green Building in the Subtropical Climate in Australia. In P. Rajagopalan, & M. M. Andamon (Eds.), Engaging Architectural Science: Meeting the Challenges of Higher Density: Proceedings of the 52nd International Conference of the Architectural Science Association (pp. 371-381). Melbourne: RMIT University Press.
Khoshbakht, Maryam ; Gou, Zhonghua ; Dupre, Karine ; Best, Rick. / Occupant Satisfaction and Comfort in Green Buildings: A Longitudinal Occupant Survey in a Green Building in the Subtropical Climate in Australia. Engaging Architectural Science: Meeting the Challenges of Higher Density: Proceedings of the 52nd International Conference of the Architectural Science Association. editor / Priyadarsini Rajagopalan ; Mary Myla Andamon. Melbourne : RMIT University Press, 2018. pp. 371-381
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title = "Occupant Satisfaction and Comfort in Green Buildings: A Longitudinal Occupant Survey in a Green Building in the Subtropical Climate in Australia",
abstract = "Understanding occupant expectation and feedback is an important part of building performance evaluation. This paper explores occupant satisfaction change during a 10-year period in a green building located in the subtropical zone. Occupant satisfaction at two timestamps, three and ten years after project completion, were compared. It was observed that occupant satisfaction regarding indoor air quality (IAQ), noise and overall building comfort remained unchanged during the 10-year post-occupancy period. This finding suggests that perceived IAQ, noise, and overall satisfaction with buildings may not be biased by point-in-time of surveys, the year weather or sample characteristics. However, satisfaction scores regarding the two parameters of lighting and thermal comfort are likely to be subject to change over time. The change in satisfaction scores in relation to thermal comfort and lighting might be explained in various ways. The change of climate and sky conditions, and different sample characteristics were the two assumptions considered worthy of further investigations. The study found some evidence of a possible correlation between year weather and occupant satisfaction responses. The study also showed that green buildings with natural ventilation may be more susceptible to climate change impacts.",
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Khoshbakht, M, Gou, Z, Dupre, K & Best, R 2018, Occupant Satisfaction and Comfort in Green Buildings: A Longitudinal Occupant Survey in a Green Building in the Subtropical Climate in Australia. in P Rajagopalan & MM Andamon (eds), Engaging Architectural Science: Meeting the Challenges of Higher Density: Proceedings of the 52nd International Conference of the Architectural Science Association. RMIT University Press, Melbourne, pp. 371-381, The 52nd International Conference of the Architectural Science Association (ANZAScA), Melbourne, Australia, 28/11/18.

Occupant Satisfaction and Comfort in Green Buildings: A Longitudinal Occupant Survey in a Green Building in the Subtropical Climate in Australia. / Khoshbakht, Maryam; Gou, Zhonghua; Dupre, Karine; Best, Rick.

Engaging Architectural Science: Meeting the Challenges of Higher Density: Proceedings of the 52nd International Conference of the Architectural Science Association. ed. / Priyadarsini Rajagopalan; Mary Myla Andamon. Melbourne : RMIT University Press, 2018. p. 371-381.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Occupant Satisfaction and Comfort in Green Buildings: A Longitudinal Occupant Survey in a Green Building in the Subtropical Climate in Australia

AU - Khoshbakht, Maryam

AU - Gou, Zhonghua

AU - Dupre, Karine

AU - Best, Rick

N1 - The copyright in these proceedings belongs to the Architectural Science Association and RMIT University. Copyright of the papers contained in these proceedings remains the property of the authors. Apart from fair dealing for the purpose of private study, research or review, as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part of this book may be reproduced by any process without the prior permission of the publishers and authors.

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Understanding occupant expectation and feedback is an important part of building performance evaluation. This paper explores occupant satisfaction change during a 10-year period in a green building located in the subtropical zone. Occupant satisfaction at two timestamps, three and ten years after project completion, were compared. It was observed that occupant satisfaction regarding indoor air quality (IAQ), noise and overall building comfort remained unchanged during the 10-year post-occupancy period. This finding suggests that perceived IAQ, noise, and overall satisfaction with buildings may not be biased by point-in-time of surveys, the year weather or sample characteristics. However, satisfaction scores regarding the two parameters of lighting and thermal comfort are likely to be subject to change over time. The change in satisfaction scores in relation to thermal comfort and lighting might be explained in various ways. The change of climate and sky conditions, and different sample characteristics were the two assumptions considered worthy of further investigations. The study found some evidence of a possible correlation between year weather and occupant satisfaction responses. The study also showed that green buildings with natural ventilation may be more susceptible to climate change impacts.

AB - Understanding occupant expectation and feedback is an important part of building performance evaluation. This paper explores occupant satisfaction change during a 10-year period in a green building located in the subtropical zone. Occupant satisfaction at two timestamps, three and ten years after project completion, were compared. It was observed that occupant satisfaction regarding indoor air quality (IAQ), noise and overall building comfort remained unchanged during the 10-year post-occupancy period. This finding suggests that perceived IAQ, noise, and overall satisfaction with buildings may not be biased by point-in-time of surveys, the year weather or sample characteristics. However, satisfaction scores regarding the two parameters of lighting and thermal comfort are likely to be subject to change over time. The change in satisfaction scores in relation to thermal comfort and lighting might be explained in various ways. The change of climate and sky conditions, and different sample characteristics were the two assumptions considered worthy of further investigations. The study found some evidence of a possible correlation between year weather and occupant satisfaction responses. The study also showed that green buildings with natural ventilation may be more susceptible to climate change impacts.

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M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 978-0-9923835-5-8

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BT - Engaging Architectural Science: Meeting the Challenges of Higher Density

A2 - Rajagopalan, Priyadarsini

A2 - Andamon, Mary Myla

PB - RMIT University Press

CY - Melbourne

ER -

Khoshbakht M, Gou Z, Dupre K, Best R. Occupant Satisfaction and Comfort in Green Buildings: A Longitudinal Occupant Survey in a Green Building in the Subtropical Climate in Australia. In Rajagopalan P, Andamon MM, editors, Engaging Architectural Science: Meeting the Challenges of Higher Density: Proceedings of the 52nd International Conference of the Architectural Science Association. Melbourne: RMIT University Press. 2018. p. 371-381