Observations on the potential loss of threatened species in urbanising Western Sydney: Death by a thousand cuts

Danny Wotherspoon, Shelley Burgin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Despite international concern for biodiversity loss, as urban pressure increases on the Cumberland Plain of Western Sydney, the native vegetation continues to be lost despite being
classified as an 'endangered ecological community' under both state and federal legislation. While substantial sized remnants may evoke public attention, small developments are often
approved without adequate attention to the long term impact on even the threatened species of the Plain. In this paper we provide examples of the way in which remnants that may be only a single housing lot in size, can be habitat for protected species. The on-going loss of these, often tiny reservoirs, is undoubtedly resulting in the loss of native biodiversity by '1000 cuts.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe natural history of Sydney
EditorsDaniel Lunney, Pat Hutchings, Dieter Hochuli
Place of PublicationNew South Wales, Australia
PublisherRoyal Zoological Society of New South Wales
Pages277-281
Number of pages5
Edition1
ISBN (Print)9780980327236
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Wotherspoon, D., & Burgin, S. (2010). Observations on the potential loss of threatened species in urbanising Western Sydney: Death by a thousand cuts. In D. Lunney, P. Hutchings, & D. Hochuli (Eds.), The natural history of Sydney (1 ed., pp. 277-281). New South Wales, Australia: Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales. https://doi.org/10.7882/FS.2010.023