Nutrition and mental health research

Where to from here?

Elisabeth Isenring*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

[Extract] Mental health disorders are a significant public health issue.There are limited data on the national prevalence of mental illness, and it is challenging to obtain accurate statistics.However, a commonly reported figure is that one in five Australians will experience mental illness at some stage during their lifetime. Using self-reported data collected during the 2004–2005 National Health Survey, an estimated 2.1 million Australians (10.7% of the population) reported along-term mental or behavioral problem. People with mental illness have much higher rates of chronic diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease, than the general population. A review of published studies under-taken in America reports that patients with schizophrenia have a 20% reduced life expectancy compared with the general American population. An Australian study, examining the death rates from heart disease in Western Australian psychiatric patients over an 18-year period (1980–1998)reported that the leading cause of mortality in users of mental health services was ischaemic heart disease (16%)compared with 8% of deaths due to suicide. However,despite this research and the National Mental Health Plan 2003–2008 recommendation to extend evidence-based mental health practice, little research has been conducted in Australia and New Zealand.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4-5
Number of pages2
JournalNutrition and Dietetics
Volume65
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Mental Health
Heart Diseases
Research
Population
Mortality
Mental Health Services
Life Expectancy
Health Surveys
New Zealand
Mental Disorders
Suicide
Myocardial Ischemia
Psychiatry
Schizophrenia
Chronic Disease
Public Health
Problem Behavior

Cite this

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abstract = "[Extract] Mental health disorders are a significant public health issue.There are limited data on the national prevalence of mental illness, and it is challenging to obtain accurate statistics.However, a commonly reported figure is that one in five Australians will experience mental illness at some stage during their lifetime. Using self-reported data collected during the 2004–2005 National Health Survey, an estimated 2.1 million Australians (10.7{\%} of the population) reported along-term mental or behavioral problem. People with mental illness have much higher rates of chronic diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease, than the general population. A review of published studies under-taken in America reports that patients with schizophrenia have a 20{\%} reduced life expectancy compared with the general American population. An Australian study, examining the death rates from heart disease in Western Australian psychiatric patients over an 18-year period (1980–1998)reported that the leading cause of mortality in users of mental health services was ischaemic heart disease (16{\%})compared with 8{\%} of deaths due to suicide. However,despite this research and the National Mental Health Plan 2003–2008 recommendation to extend evidence-based mental health practice, little research has been conducted in Australia and New Zealand.",
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Nutrition and mental health research : Where to from here? / Isenring, Elisabeth.

In: Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol. 65, No. 1, 01.03.2008, p. 4-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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