No differences in satiety or energy intake after high-fructose corn syrup, sucrose, or milk preloads

Stijn Soenen, Margriet S. Westerterp-Plantenga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Background: It is unclear whether energy-containing drinks, especially those sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), promote positive energy balance and thereby play a role in the development of obesity. Objective: The objective was to examine the satiating effects of HFCS and sucrose in comparison with milk and a diet drink. Design: The effects of 4800-mL drinks containing no energy or 1.5 MJ from sucrose, HFCS, or milk on satiety were assessed, first in 15 men and 15 women with a mean (±SD) body mass index (BMI; in kg/m 2) of 22.1 ± 1.9 according to visual analogue scales (VAS) and blood variables and second in 20 men and 20 women (BMI: 22.4 ± 2.1) according to ingestion of a standardized ad libitum meal (granola cereal + yogurt, 10.1 kJ/g). Results: Fifty minutes after consumption of the 1.5-MJ preload drinks containing sucrose, HFCS, or milk, 170%-mm VAS changes in satiety were observed. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) (P < 0.001) and ghrelin (P < 0.05) concentrations changed accordingly. Compensatory energy intake did not differ significantly between the 3 preloads and ranged from 30% to 45%. Energy intake compensations were related to satiety (r = 0.35, P < 0.05). No differences were observed between the effects of the sucrose- and HFCS-containing drinks on changes in VAS and on insulin, glucose, GLP-1, and ghrelin concentrations. Changes in appetite VAS ratings were a function of changes in GLP-1, ghrelin, insulin, and glucose concentrations. Conclusion: Energy balance consequences of HFCS-sweetened soft drinks are not different from those of other isoenergetic drinks, eg, a sucrose-drink or milk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1586-1594
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume86
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2007
Externally publishedYes

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high fructose corn syrup
satiety
Energy Intake
Sucrose
energy intake
Milk
sucrose
glucagon-like peptide 1
Visual Analog Scale
milk
ghrelin
Ghrelin
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1
energy balance
insulin
Energy Drinks
Insulin
Carbonated Beverages
Glucose
Yogurt

Cite this

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title = "No differences in satiety or energy intake after high-fructose corn syrup, sucrose, or milk preloads",
abstract = "Background: It is unclear whether energy-containing drinks, especially those sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), promote positive energy balance and thereby play a role in the development of obesity. Objective: The objective was to examine the satiating effects of HFCS and sucrose in comparison with milk and a diet drink. Design: The effects of 4800-mL drinks containing no energy or 1.5 MJ from sucrose, HFCS, or milk on satiety were assessed, first in 15 men and 15 women with a mean (±SD) body mass index (BMI; in kg/m 2) of 22.1 ± 1.9 according to visual analogue scales (VAS) and blood variables and second in 20 men and 20 women (BMI: 22.4 ± 2.1) according to ingestion of a standardized ad libitum meal (granola cereal + yogurt, 10.1 kJ/g). Results: Fifty minutes after consumption of the 1.5-MJ preload drinks containing sucrose, HFCS, or milk, 170{\%}-mm VAS changes in satiety were observed. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) (P < 0.001) and ghrelin (P < 0.05) concentrations changed accordingly. Compensatory energy intake did not differ significantly between the 3 preloads and ranged from 30{\%} to 45{\%}. Energy intake compensations were related to satiety (r = 0.35, P < 0.05). No differences were observed between the effects of the sucrose- and HFCS-containing drinks on changes in VAS and on insulin, glucose, GLP-1, and ghrelin concentrations. Changes in appetite VAS ratings were a function of changes in GLP-1, ghrelin, insulin, and glucose concentrations. Conclusion: Energy balance consequences of HFCS-sweetened soft drinks are not different from those of other isoenergetic drinks, eg, a sucrose-drink or milk.",
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No differences in satiety or energy intake after high-fructose corn syrup, sucrose, or milk preloads. / Soenen, Stijn; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 86, No. 6, 01.12.2007, p. 1586-1594.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S.

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