Neurobiological and psychological evidence of chronic stress in prostate cancer patients

C. F. Sharpley, D. R.H. Christie, V. Bitsika, L. L. Agnew, N. M. Andronicos, M. E. McMillan, T. M. Richards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To measure the prevalence and severity of Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD), hypo- and hypercortisolaemia, and their association in a sample of prostate cancer (PCa) patients, 97 Australian PCa patients completed a background questionnaire and the GAD-7, and provided a sample of saliva collected 30–45 min after waking. The mean GAD7 score was 9.67 (SD = 3.09), and prevalence rates for current anxiety were higher than those reported for non-PCa males of a similar age. Mean salivary cortisol concentrations (30.78 nmol/L, SD = 13.97 nmol/L) were also higher than for age-comparative non-PCa men. There was a significant inverse correlation between GAD and cortisol (r = −. 209, p <.05), and four subgroups of GAD-cortisol patients were able to be identified, with evidence of both hyper- and hypocortisolaemia. These findings provide initial neurobiological evidence of the chronic and profound nature of stress experienced by PCa patients, and also suggest a possible measure that might be used to identify most at-risk PCa patients.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere12671
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Cancer Care
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2017

Fingerprint

Prostatic Neoplasms
Anxiety Disorders
Psychology
Hydrocortisone
Saliva
Neoplasms
Anxiety

Cite this

Sharpley, C. F., Christie, D. R. H., Bitsika, V., Agnew, L. L., Andronicos, N. M., McMillan, M. E., & Richards, T. M. (2017). Neurobiological and psychological evidence of chronic stress in prostate cancer patients. European Journal of Cancer Care, 26(6), [e12671]. https://doi.org/10.1111/ecc.12671
Sharpley, C. F. ; Christie, D. R.H. ; Bitsika, V. ; Agnew, L. L. ; Andronicos, N. M. ; McMillan, M. E. ; Richards, T. M. / Neurobiological and psychological evidence of chronic stress in prostate cancer patients. In: European Journal of Cancer Care. 2017 ; Vol. 26, No. 6.
@article{d4e9b443fe674dae8f935b77d29947d3,
title = "Neurobiological and psychological evidence of chronic stress in prostate cancer patients",
abstract = "To measure the prevalence and severity of Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD), hypo- and hypercortisolaemia, and their association in a sample of prostate cancer (PCa) patients, 97 Australian PCa patients completed a background questionnaire and the GAD-7, and provided a sample of saliva collected 30–45 min after waking. The mean GAD7 score was 9.67 (SD = 3.09), and prevalence rates for current anxiety were higher than those reported for non-PCa males of a similar age. Mean salivary cortisol concentrations (30.78 nmol/L, SD = 13.97 nmol/L) were also higher than for age-comparative non-PCa men. There was a significant inverse correlation between GAD and cortisol (r = −. 209, p <.05), and four subgroups of GAD-cortisol patients were able to be identified, with evidence of both hyper- and hypocortisolaemia. These findings provide initial neurobiological evidence of the chronic and profound nature of stress experienced by PCa patients, and also suggest a possible measure that might be used to identify most at-risk PCa patients.",
author = "Sharpley, {C. F.} and Christie, {D. R.H.} and V. Bitsika and Agnew, {L. L.} and Andronicos, {N. M.} and McMillan, {M. E.} and Richards, {T. M.}",
year = "2017",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/ecc.12671",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
journal = "European Journal of Cancer Care",
issn = "0961-5423",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

Sharpley, CF, Christie, DRH, Bitsika, V, Agnew, LL, Andronicos, NM, McMillan, ME & Richards, TM 2017, 'Neurobiological and psychological evidence of chronic stress in prostate cancer patients' European Journal of Cancer Care, vol. 26, no. 6, e12671. https://doi.org/10.1111/ecc.12671

Neurobiological and psychological evidence of chronic stress in prostate cancer patients. / Sharpley, C. F.; Christie, D. R.H.; Bitsika, V.; Agnew, L. L.; Andronicos, N. M.; McMillan, M. E.; Richards, T. M.

In: European Journal of Cancer Care, Vol. 26, No. 6, e12671, 01.11.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neurobiological and psychological evidence of chronic stress in prostate cancer patients

AU - Sharpley, C. F.

AU - Christie, D. R.H.

AU - Bitsika, V.

AU - Agnew, L. L.

AU - Andronicos, N. M.

AU - McMillan, M. E.

AU - Richards, T. M.

PY - 2017/11/1

Y1 - 2017/11/1

N2 - To measure the prevalence and severity of Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD), hypo- and hypercortisolaemia, and their association in a sample of prostate cancer (PCa) patients, 97 Australian PCa patients completed a background questionnaire and the GAD-7, and provided a sample of saliva collected 30–45 min after waking. The mean GAD7 score was 9.67 (SD = 3.09), and prevalence rates for current anxiety were higher than those reported for non-PCa males of a similar age. Mean salivary cortisol concentrations (30.78 nmol/L, SD = 13.97 nmol/L) were also higher than for age-comparative non-PCa men. There was a significant inverse correlation between GAD and cortisol (r = −. 209, p <.05), and four subgroups of GAD-cortisol patients were able to be identified, with evidence of both hyper- and hypocortisolaemia. These findings provide initial neurobiological evidence of the chronic and profound nature of stress experienced by PCa patients, and also suggest a possible measure that might be used to identify most at-risk PCa patients.

AB - To measure the prevalence and severity of Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD), hypo- and hypercortisolaemia, and their association in a sample of prostate cancer (PCa) patients, 97 Australian PCa patients completed a background questionnaire and the GAD-7, and provided a sample of saliva collected 30–45 min after waking. The mean GAD7 score was 9.67 (SD = 3.09), and prevalence rates for current anxiety were higher than those reported for non-PCa males of a similar age. Mean salivary cortisol concentrations (30.78 nmol/L, SD = 13.97 nmol/L) were also higher than for age-comparative non-PCa men. There was a significant inverse correlation between GAD and cortisol (r = −. 209, p <.05), and four subgroups of GAD-cortisol patients were able to be identified, with evidence of both hyper- and hypocortisolaemia. These findings provide initial neurobiological evidence of the chronic and profound nature of stress experienced by PCa patients, and also suggest a possible measure that might be used to identify most at-risk PCa patients.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85032887471&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/ecc.12671

DO - 10.1111/ecc.12671

M3 - Article

VL - 26

JO - European Journal of Cancer Care

JF - European Journal of Cancer Care

SN - 0961-5423

IS - 6

M1 - e12671

ER -

Sharpley CF, Christie DRH, Bitsika V, Agnew LL, Andronicos NM, McMillan ME et al. Neurobiological and psychological evidence of chronic stress in prostate cancer patients. European Journal of Cancer Care. 2017 Nov 1;26(6). e12671. https://doi.org/10.1111/ecc.12671