Neural Expression of Creativity in Real and Augmented Reality Environments

Andreas Frangos, Tae-Jun Lee, Dylan To, Jessica McFadyen, Oliver Baumann, I Giannopulu

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterResearchpeer-review

17 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Bridging brain activity and technology, the proposed research examines people’s creative expressions through building an installation in a 3D augmented reality environment. It is strongly motivated to offer a nuanced understanding of the relationship between brain activities and creative expressions. Through broadening people’s perceptual experiences and even creating new experiential dimensions that are previously unexplored, the new virtual technology would substantially benefit brain functioning. By being “present” and “immersive” in a virtual environment, to express creativity, our assumption was that a wide network of brain regions would be mobilized in healthy participants. Wearing a Hololens (HMD) and a mobita 32-channel wireless EEG, 14 participants aged 25 years old in average have been invited to perform three conditions, all randomised, using common and uncommon objects: (a) imagine building an installation in the real environment (b) imagine building an installation in augmented reality, and (c) execute an installation in augmented reality. All participants were given 2.30 minutes to perform the task as instructed for both objects. Preliminary EEG data revealed similar alpha, beta and theta brain activities between common and uncommon objects within each condition in left and right parietal and frontal lobes. Moreover, alpha, beta and theta activities were similar in right and left parietal and frontal lobes when participants were invited to imagine creating an installation in real and virtual environments, but they were significantly higher in left that in right parietal and frontal lobes when an installation was virtually executed. In this light, our findings would be consistent with the idea that different styles of creativity underline some common neurobiological processes. By charting the neural basis of creativity in the virtual reality, it would become possible to understand why some people are more creative than others and eventually to understand how to make people more creative.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 8 Dec 2018
Event16th Australian Conference on Personality & Individual Differences: Advances and Challenges in Personality and Individual Differences – Theories and Applications - Bond University, Gold Coast, Australia
Duration: 6 Dec 20188 Dec 2018
Conference number: 16th
https://bond.edu.au/acpid2018

Conference

Conference16th Australian Conference on Personality & Individual Differences
Abbreviated titleACPID 2018
CountryAustralia
CityGold Coast
Period6/12/188/12/18
OtherBond University's Faculty of Society & Design is pleased to host the 16th Australian Conference on Personality & Individual Differences (ACPID 2018) on the Gold Coast, Australia. Bond University last hosted the ACPID conference in 2008. The theme for 2018, a decade later, is on ' Advances and Challenges in Personality and Individual Differences – Theories and Applications '. The main objective of the conference is to share the advances and challenges you have seen (or hope to see), as researchers, postgraduate students, practising professionals, educators, administrators and creative thinkers interested in increasing our understanding of personality and individual differences and their impacts.
Internet address

Fingerprint

Augmented reality
Brain
Virtual reality
Electroencephalography
Helmet mounted displays

Cite this

Frangos, A., Lee, T-J., To, D., McFadyen, J., Baumann, O., & Giannopulu, I. (2018). Neural Expression of Creativity in Real and Augmented Reality Environments. Poster session presented at 16th Australian Conference on Personality & Individual Differences, Gold Coast, Australia.
Frangos, Andreas ; Lee, Tae-Jun ; To, Dylan ; McFadyen, Jessica ; Baumann, Oliver ; Giannopulu, I. / Neural Expression of Creativity in Real and Augmented Reality Environments. Poster session presented at 16th Australian Conference on Personality & Individual Differences, Gold Coast, Australia.
@conference{b4c7cda8a1a74dbd839341b31ed66c6b,
title = "Neural Expression of Creativity in Real and Augmented Reality Environments",
abstract = "Bridging brain activity and technology, the proposed research examines people’s creative expressions through building an installation in a 3D augmented reality environment. It is strongly motivated to offer a nuanced understanding of the relationship between brain activities and creative expressions. Through broadening people’s perceptual experiences and even creating new experiential dimensions that are previously unexplored, the new virtual technology would substantially benefit brain functioning. By being “present” and “immersive” in a virtual environment, to express creativity, our assumption was that a wide network of brain regions would be mobilized in healthy participants. Wearing a Hololens (HMD) and a mobita 32-channel wireless EEG, 14 participants aged 25 years old in average have been invited to perform three conditions, all randomised, using common and uncommon objects: (a) imagine building an installation in the real environment (b) imagine building an installation in augmented reality, and (c) execute an installation in augmented reality. All participants were given 2.30 minutes to perform the task as instructed for both objects. Preliminary EEG data revealed similar alpha, beta and theta brain activities between common and uncommon objects within each condition in left and right parietal and frontal lobes. Moreover, alpha, beta and theta activities were similar in right and left parietal and frontal lobes when participants were invited to imagine creating an installation in real and virtual environments, but they were significantly higher in left that in right parietal and frontal lobes when an installation was virtually executed. In this light, our findings would be consistent with the idea that different styles of creativity underline some common neurobiological processes. By charting the neural basis of creativity in the virtual reality, it would become possible to understand why some people are more creative than others and eventually to understand how to make people more creative.",
author = "Andreas Frangos and Tae-Jun Lee and Dylan To and Jessica McFadyen and Oliver Baumann and I Giannopulu",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "8",
language = "English",
note = "16th Australian Conference on Personality & Individual Differences : Advances and Challenges in Personality and Individual Differences – Theories and Applications, ACPID 2018 ; Conference date: 06-12-2018 Through 08-12-2018",
url = "https://bond.edu.au/acpid2018",

}

Frangos, A, Lee, T-J, To, D, McFadyen, J, Baumann, O & Giannopulu, I 2018, 'Neural Expression of Creativity in Real and Augmented Reality Environments' 16th Australian Conference on Personality & Individual Differences, Gold Coast, Australia, 6/12/18 - 8/12/18, .

Neural Expression of Creativity in Real and Augmented Reality Environments. / Frangos, Andreas; Lee, Tae-Jun; To, Dylan; McFadyen, Jessica; Baumann, Oliver; Giannopulu, I.

2018. Poster session presented at 16th Australian Conference on Personality & Individual Differences, Gold Coast, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Neural Expression of Creativity in Real and Augmented Reality Environments

AU - Frangos, Andreas

AU - Lee, Tae-Jun

AU - To, Dylan

AU - McFadyen, Jessica

AU - Baumann, Oliver

AU - Giannopulu, I

PY - 2018/12/8

Y1 - 2018/12/8

N2 - Bridging brain activity and technology, the proposed research examines people’s creative expressions through building an installation in a 3D augmented reality environment. It is strongly motivated to offer a nuanced understanding of the relationship between brain activities and creative expressions. Through broadening people’s perceptual experiences and even creating new experiential dimensions that are previously unexplored, the new virtual technology would substantially benefit brain functioning. By being “present” and “immersive” in a virtual environment, to express creativity, our assumption was that a wide network of brain regions would be mobilized in healthy participants. Wearing a Hololens (HMD) and a mobita 32-channel wireless EEG, 14 participants aged 25 years old in average have been invited to perform three conditions, all randomised, using common and uncommon objects: (a) imagine building an installation in the real environment (b) imagine building an installation in augmented reality, and (c) execute an installation in augmented reality. All participants were given 2.30 minutes to perform the task as instructed for both objects. Preliminary EEG data revealed similar alpha, beta and theta brain activities between common and uncommon objects within each condition in left and right parietal and frontal lobes. Moreover, alpha, beta and theta activities were similar in right and left parietal and frontal lobes when participants were invited to imagine creating an installation in real and virtual environments, but they were significantly higher in left that in right parietal and frontal lobes when an installation was virtually executed. In this light, our findings would be consistent with the idea that different styles of creativity underline some common neurobiological processes. By charting the neural basis of creativity in the virtual reality, it would become possible to understand why some people are more creative than others and eventually to understand how to make people more creative.

AB - Bridging brain activity and technology, the proposed research examines people’s creative expressions through building an installation in a 3D augmented reality environment. It is strongly motivated to offer a nuanced understanding of the relationship between brain activities and creative expressions. Through broadening people’s perceptual experiences and even creating new experiential dimensions that are previously unexplored, the new virtual technology would substantially benefit brain functioning. By being “present” and “immersive” in a virtual environment, to express creativity, our assumption was that a wide network of brain regions would be mobilized in healthy participants. Wearing a Hololens (HMD) and a mobita 32-channel wireless EEG, 14 participants aged 25 years old in average have been invited to perform three conditions, all randomised, using common and uncommon objects: (a) imagine building an installation in the real environment (b) imagine building an installation in augmented reality, and (c) execute an installation in augmented reality. All participants were given 2.30 minutes to perform the task as instructed for both objects. Preliminary EEG data revealed similar alpha, beta and theta brain activities between common and uncommon objects within each condition in left and right parietal and frontal lobes. Moreover, alpha, beta and theta activities were similar in right and left parietal and frontal lobes when participants were invited to imagine creating an installation in real and virtual environments, but they were significantly higher in left that in right parietal and frontal lobes when an installation was virtually executed. In this light, our findings would be consistent with the idea that different styles of creativity underline some common neurobiological processes. By charting the neural basis of creativity in the virtual reality, it would become possible to understand why some people are more creative than others and eventually to understand how to make people more creative.

M3 - Poster

ER -

Frangos A, Lee T-J, To D, McFadyen J, Baumann O, Giannopulu I. Neural Expression of Creativity in Real and Augmented Reality Environments. 2018. Poster session presented at 16th Australian Conference on Personality & Individual Differences, Gold Coast, Australia.