Muslim women's physician preference: Beyond obstetrics and gynecology

Michelle McLean, Fatima Al Yahyaei, Muneera Al Mansoori, Mouza Al Ameri, Salma Al Ahbabi, Roos Bernsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When Emirati (Muslim) women (n = 218) were asked about their preferred physician (in terms of gender, religion, and nationality) for three personal clinical scenarios, a female was almost exclusively preferred for the gynecological (96.8%) and "stomach" (94.5%) scenarios, while ±46% of the women also preferred a female physician for the facial allergy scenario. Only 17% considered physician gender important for the prepubertal child scenario. Just over half of the women preferred a Muslim physician for personal examinations (vs. 37.6% for the child). Being less educated and having a lower literacy level were significant predictors of preferred physician religion for some personal scenarios, whereas a higher education level was a significant predictor for physician gender not mattering for the facial allergy scenario. Muslim women's preference for same gender physicians, and to a lesser extent religion, has implications for health care services beyond obstetrics and gynecology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)849-76
Number of pages28
JournalHealth Care for Women International
Volume33
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Women Physicians
Islam
Gynecology
Obstetrics
Physicians
Religion
Hypersensitivity
Ethnic Groups
Health Services
Stomach
Delivery of Health Care
Education

Cite this

McLean, Michelle ; Al Yahyaei, Fatima ; Al Mansoori, Muneera ; Al Ameri, Mouza ; Al Ahbabi, Salma ; Bernsen, Roos. / Muslim women's physician preference : Beyond obstetrics and gynecology. In: Health Care for Women International. 2012 ; Vol. 33, No. 9. pp. 849-76.
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McLean, M, Al Yahyaei, F, Al Mansoori, M, Al Ameri, M, Al Ahbabi, S & Bernsen, R 2012, 'Muslim women's physician preference: Beyond obstetrics and gynecology' Health Care for Women International, vol. 33, no. 9, pp. 849-76. https://doi.org/10.1080/07399332.2011.645963

Muslim women's physician preference : Beyond obstetrics and gynecology. / McLean, Michelle; Al Yahyaei, Fatima; Al Mansoori, Muneera; Al Ameri, Mouza; Al Ahbabi, Salma; Bernsen, Roos.

In: Health Care for Women International, Vol. 33, No. 9, 2012, p. 849-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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