Multitrack diplomatic approaches to border and territorial disputes in Southeast Asia and soft balancing

Alica Kizeková

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

[Extract] Conducting security dialogues through multilateral frameworks in Southeast Asia has been a rather recent development. During the Cold War, the Asian security environment was poised with ideological divisions dominated by
the Soviet Union and the United States, lingering deep-seated historical animosities among states and great differences in economic development. There was not adequate confidence and trust to engage in any major multinational
regional cooperation in the security arena. On the other hand, the strategic environments of post-Cold-War Southeast and East Asia have been in a situation when various proposals for a more structured and inclusive institutional security architecture were designed to encourage an increased confidence among states and the overall readiness to conduct multilateral consultations. These processes have been in particular driven by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), which faced a dilemma of how to position itself in the region in the early 1990s. The pressing concerns were the uncertainty of us presence and Washington’s future commitment to the region, in addition to apprehension over a rising China. At that time, ASEAN was not fully accommodating to us requests with regard to basing rights (as in the case of the Philippines not renewing the us lease at Subic Bay in 1991), and it was not fully engaging China within its frameworks (Acharya 2014; Emmers 2003; Simon 1996).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnresolved Border, Land and Maritime Disputes in Southeast Asia
Subtitle of host publicationBi- and Multilateral Conflict Resolution Approaches and ASEAN's Centrality
EditorsAlfred Gerstl, Maria Strasakova
PublisherBrill
Pages143-167
Number of pages25
ISBN (Electronic)9789004312159, 9789004312180
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Nov 2016
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameStudies in East Asian Security and International Relations
Volume4
ISSN (Print)2213-1051

Fingerprint

Southeast Asia
ASEAN
cold war
confidence
China
Philippines
USSR
dialogue
uncertainty
commitment
economics

Cite this

Kizeková, A. (2016). Multitrack diplomatic approaches to border and territorial disputes in Southeast Asia and soft balancing. In A. Gerstl, & M. Strasakova (Eds.), Unresolved Border, Land and Maritime Disputes in Southeast Asia: Bi- and Multilateral Conflict Resolution Approaches and ASEAN's Centrality (pp. 143-167). (Studies in East Asian Security and International Relations; Vol. 4). Brill. https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004312180_007
Kizeková, Alica. / Multitrack diplomatic approaches to border and territorial disputes in Southeast Asia and soft balancing. Unresolved Border, Land and Maritime Disputes in Southeast Asia: Bi- and Multilateral Conflict Resolution Approaches and ASEAN's Centrality. editor / Alfred Gerstl ; Maria Strasakova. Brill, 2016. pp. 143-167 (Studies in East Asian Security and International Relations).
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Kizeková, A 2016, Multitrack diplomatic approaches to border and territorial disputes in Southeast Asia and soft balancing. in A Gerstl & M Strasakova (eds), Unresolved Border, Land and Maritime Disputes in Southeast Asia: Bi- and Multilateral Conflict Resolution Approaches and ASEAN's Centrality. Studies in East Asian Security and International Relations, vol. 4, Brill, pp. 143-167. https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004312180_007

Multitrack diplomatic approaches to border and territorial disputes in Southeast Asia and soft balancing. / Kizeková, Alica.

Unresolved Border, Land and Maritime Disputes in Southeast Asia: Bi- and Multilateral Conflict Resolution Approaches and ASEAN's Centrality. ed. / Alfred Gerstl; Maria Strasakova. Brill, 2016. p. 143-167 (Studies in East Asian Security and International Relations; Vol. 4).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

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Kizeková A. Multitrack diplomatic approaches to border and territorial disputes in Southeast Asia and soft balancing. In Gerstl A, Strasakova M, editors, Unresolved Border, Land and Maritime Disputes in Southeast Asia: Bi- and Multilateral Conflict Resolution Approaches and ASEAN's Centrality. Brill. 2016. p. 143-167. (Studies in East Asian Security and International Relations). https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004312180_007