Multimodal human-robot interactions: The neurorehabilitation of severe autistic children

Irini Giannopulu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the context of human-robot interactions, we studied quantitatively and qualitatively the interaction between autistic children and a mobile toy robot during free spontaneous game play. A range of cognitive nonverbal criteria including eye contact, touch, manipulation, and posture were analysed, firstly in a dyadic interaction and secondly in a triadic interaction. Once the cognitive state between the child and the robot established, the child interacts with a third person displaying positive emotion. Both dyadic and triadic interactions of autistic children and a mobile toy robot suggest that the mobile toy robot in an ecological situation such as free, spontaneous game play could be used as a neural mediator in order to improve children's brain activity.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationACHI 2013 - 6th International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions
EditorsLeslie Miller
PublisherInternational Academy, Research, and Industry Association (IARIA)
Pages68-73
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781612082509
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes
EventInternational Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions - Nice, France, Nice, France
Duration: 24 Feb 20131 Mar 2013
Conference number: 6th
https://www.iaria.org/conferences2013/ACHI13.html

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions
Abbreviated titleACHI 2013
CountryFrance
CityNice
Period24/02/131/03/13
Internet address

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  • Cite this

    Giannopulu, I. (2013). Multimodal human-robot interactions: The neurorehabilitation of severe autistic children. In L. Miller (Ed.), ACHI 2013 - 6th International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions (pp. 68-73). International Academy, Research, and Industry Association (IARIA). http://www.thinkmind.org/index.php?view=instance&instance=ACHI+2013