Monitoring neuromuscular fatigue in team-sport athletes using a cycle-ergometer test

George Wehbe, Tim J. Gabbett, Dan Dwyer, Christopher McLellan, Sam Coad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To compare a novel sprint test on a cycle ergometer with a countermovement-jump (CMJ) test for monitoring neuromuscular fatigue after Australian rules football match play. Methods: Twelve elite under-18 Australian rules football players (mean ± SD age 17.5 ± 0.6 y, stature 184.7 ± 8.8 cm, body mass 75.3 ± 7.8 kg) from an Australian Football League club's Academy program performed a short sprint test on a cycle ergometer along with a single CMJ test 1 h prematch and 1, 24, and 48 h postmatch. The cycle-ergometer sprint test involved a standardized warm-up, a maximal 6-s sprint, a 1-min active recovery, and a 2nd maximal 6-s sprint, with the highest power output of the 2 sprints recorded as peak power (PP). Results: There were small to moderate differences between postmatch changes in cycle-ergometer PP and CMJ PP at 1 (ES = 0.49), 24 (ES = -0.85), and 48 h postmatch (ES = 0.44). There was a substantial reduction in cycle-ergometer PP at 24 h postmatch (ES = -0.40) compared with 1 h prematch. Conclusions: The cycle-ergometer sprint test described in this study offers a novel method of neuromuscular-fatigue monitoring in team-sport athletes and specifically quantifies the concentric component of the fatigue-induced decrement of force production in muscle, which may be overlooked by a CMJ test.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)292-297
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2015

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Neuromuscular Monitoring
Football
Athletes
Sports
Fatigue
Muscles

Cite this

Wehbe, George ; Gabbett, Tim J. ; Dwyer, Dan ; McLellan, Christopher ; Coad, Sam. / Monitoring neuromuscular fatigue in team-sport athletes using a cycle-ergometer test. In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 3. pp. 292-297.
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Monitoring neuromuscular fatigue in team-sport athletes using a cycle-ergometer test. / Wehbe, George; Gabbett, Tim J.; Dwyer, Dan; McLellan, Christopher; Coad, Sam.

In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, Vol. 10, No. 3, 01.04.2015, p. 292-297.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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