Mirabegron and solifenacin are effective for the management of the increased urinary frequency induced by psychological stress in female mice

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Abstract

Evidence to support the effectiveness of β3-adrenoceptor agonist mirabegron and anti-muscarinic solifenacin in the management of bladder dysfunction caused by psychological stress is lacking. This study investigates whether mirabegron or solifenacin reduces the bladder overactivity caused by water avoidance stress (WAS) in mice. Female mice were exposed to WAS for 1 h/day for 10 days and received either placebo, solifenacin or mirabegron in drinking water. Controls were age-matched without stress exposure. Voiding behaviour and functional isolated whole bladder responses during distension and in response to pharmacological agents and electrical field stimulation was investigated. Urinary frequency was significantly increased following stress. Mice treated with mirabegron or solifenacin displayed significantly fewer voiding events compared to the stressed mice, and voiding frequency in drug-treated animals was comparable to unstressed controls. The maximal contractile responses of bladders to carbachol were significantly enhanced by stress and reduced by mirabegron but not solifenacin. The frequency of phasic bladder contractions following stimulation with carbachol was significantly enhanced following stress and remained elevated in the mirabegron treated group. However, treatment with solifenacin significantly reduced the frequency of phasic contractions to unstressed control levels. Solifenacin and mirabegron are beneficial in reducing the overall voiding dysfunction caused by WAS in mice.

Original languageEnglish
Article number12365
JournalScientific Reports
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jul 2022

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