Mindfulness as a factor in the relationship between insecure attachment style, neurotic personality and disordered eating behaviour

Aileen M. Pidgeon, Alexandra Grainger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Mindfulness, conceptualized as a dispositional trait that differs across individuals, may potentially influence disordered eating behaviors. Previous research has independently identified insecure attachment style and neurotic personality traits as correlates of disordered eating behavior. Thus this current study will investigate whether neurotic personality traits, insecure attachment style and mindfulness predict disordered eating behavior controlling for gender differences. Participants (N = 126) completed the Adult Attachment Scale [1], the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire – Revised 18 [2], The Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness Scale – Revised [3] and the International Personality Item Pool [4]. The results of this cross-sectional study indicated that neurotic personality traits, insecure attachment style and mindfulness were related to disordered eating behaviors. The variance in disordered eating behaviors that was accounted for by neurotic personality traits and insecure attachment style was significantly reduced with the introduction of mindfulness. The results provides preliminary support for the inclusion of mindfulness training in disordered eating behavior interventions for individuals exhibiting an insecure attachment style and neurotic personality traits. Limitations and implications for further research are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25-32
Number of pages8
JournalOpen Journal of Medical Psychology
Volume2
Issue number4B
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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