Mid-aged adults' sitting time in three contexts

Nicola W. Burton*, Michele Haynes, Jannique G.Z. Van Uffelen, Wendy J. Brown, Gavin Turrell

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: To develop evidence-based approaches for reducing sedentary behavior, there is a need to identify the specific settings where prolonged sitting occurs, associated factors, and variations. Purpose: To examine the sociodemographic and health factors associated with mid-aged adults' sitting time in three contexts and variations between weekdays and weekend days. Methods: A mail survey was sent to 17,000 adults (aged 4065 years) in 2007; 11,037 responses were received (68.5%); and 7719 were analyzed in 2010. Respondents indicated time spent sitting on a usual weekday and weekend day for watching TV, general leisure, and home computer use. Multivariate linear mixed models with area-level random intercepts were used to examine (1) associations between sociodemographic and health variables and sitting time, and (2) interaction effects of weekday/weekend day with each of gender, age, education, and employment status, on sitting time. Results: For each context, longer sitting times were reported by those single and living alone, and those whose health restricted activity. For watching TV, longer sitting times were reported by men; smokers; and those with high school or lower education, not in paid employment, in poor health, and with BMI <25. For general leisure, longer sitting times were reported by women, smokers, and those not employed full-time. For home computer use, longer sitting times were reported by men; and those aged 4044 years, with university qualifications; in the mid-income range; and with BMI <30. Sitting times tended to be longer on weekend days than weekdays, although the extent of this differed among sociodemographic groups. Conclusions: Sociodemographic and health factors associated with sitting time differ by context and between weekdays and weekend days.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)363-373
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume42
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2012
Externally publishedYes

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