Meta-knowledge of culture promotes cultural competence

Angela K y Leung, Sau lai Lee, Chi Yue Chiu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A behavioral signature of cross-cultural competence is discriminative use of culturally appropriate behavioral strategies in different cultural contexts. Given the central role communication plays in cross-cultural adjustment and adaptation, the present investigation examines how meta-knowledge of culture-defined as knowledge of what members of a certain culture know-affects culturally competent cross-cultural communication. We reported two studies that examined display of discriminative, culturally sensitive use of cross-cultural communication strategies by bicultural Hong Kong Chinese (Study 1), Chinese students in the United States and European Americans (Study 2). Results showed that individuals formulating a communicative message for a member of a certain culture would discriminatively apply meta-knowledge of the culture. These results suggest that unsuccessful cross-cultural communications may arise not only from the lack of motivation to take the perspective of individuals in a foreign culture, but also from inaccurate meta-knowledge of the foreign culture.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)992-1006
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
Volume44
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Cultural Competency
Communication
Social Adjustment
communication
Hong Kong
Motivation
Students
communications
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Leung, Angela K y ; Lee, Sau lai ; Chiu, Chi Yue. / Meta-knowledge of culture promotes cultural competence. In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2013 ; Vol. 44, No. 6. pp. 992-1006.
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Meta-knowledge of culture promotes cultural competence. / Leung, Angela K y; Lee, Sau lai; Chiu, Chi Yue.

In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Vol. 44, No. 6, 08.2013, p. 992-1006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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