Measuring the Impact of a Faculty Development Program on Clinical Educators

Balakrishnan R. Nair, Conor Gilligan*, Brian Jolly

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Introduction:

An Academy of Clinical Educators (ACE) was established at the University of Newcastle, to support and build capacity among existing and prospective medical educators. ACE established a Certificate of Clinical Teaching and Supervision (CCTS) program, the final assessment of which was a reflective piece on how the course has affected participants’ practice as clinical teachers or supervisors and how changes are expected to impact learner achievement. We conducted a qualitative evaluation of these to explore the impact of the CCTS on participants’ teaching. 

Methods: 

Thirty-one participants (of 90 completers to date) consented for their written reflections to undergo qualitative thematic analysis and completed a survey exploring their preparation for, and experience of the program, and application of skills learnt. 

Results: 

Most participants reported applying the skills gained through the CCTS to their teaching practice to a large (n=23; 72%) or very large (n=5; 16%) extent. Four themes emerged from the qualitative data, aligned with the topics of the CCTS: teaching structure; feedback; orientation; and assessment. Participants described application of more structured approaches to orientation, teaching and feedback, positive student responses, and self-reported satisfaction with adopted changes. 

Discussion: 

The CCTS has motivated change in the teaching practice of participants. Although evidence presented here is limited by the self-reported nature, descriptions of actual changes in practice were detailed and specific enough to suggest they could act as a proxy for objectively measured change in behaviour and outcome. 

Conclusion: 

A faculty development program delivered to clinicians with a range of teaching and education-related roles, from varied clinical disciplines and professions, can promote improved, structured teaching and feedback.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)129-136
Number of pages8
JournalAdvances in Medical Education and Practice
Volume13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022
Externally publishedYes

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