Mastectomy or breast conserving surgery? Factors affecting type of surgical treatment for breast cancer - A classification tree approach

Michael A. Martin, Ramona Meyricke, Terry O'Neill, Steven Roberts

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27 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Background: A critical choice facing breast cancer patients is which surgical treatment - mastectomy or breast conserving surgery (BCS) - is most appropriate. Several studies have investigated factors that impact the type of surgery chosen, identifying features such as place of residence, age at diagnosis, tumor size, socio-economic and racial/ethnic elements as relevant. Such assessment of "propensity" is important in understanding issues such as a reported under-utilisation of BCS among women for whom such treatment was not contraindicated. Using Western Australian (WA) data, we further examine the factors associated with the type of surgical treatment for breast cancer using a classification tree approach. This approach deals naturally with complicated interactions between factors, and so allows flexible and interpretable models for treatment choice to be built that add to the current understanding of this complex decision process. Methods: Data was extracted from the WA Cancer Registry on women diagnosed with breast cancer in WA from 1990 to 2000. Subjects' treatment preferences were predicted from covariates using both classification trees and logistic regression. Results: Tumor size was the primary determinant of patient choice, subjects with tumors smaller than 20 mm in diameter preferring BCS. For subjects with tumors greater than 20 mm in diameter factors such as patient age, nodal status, and tumor histology become relevant as predictors of patient choice. Conclusion: Classification trees perform as well as logistic regression for predicting patient choice, but are much easier to interpret for clinical use. The selected tree can inform clinicians' advice to patients.

Original languageEnglish
Article number98
JournalBMC Cancer
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Apr 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Segmental Mastectomy
Mastectomy
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Logistic Models
Registries
Histology
Economics

Cite this

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title = "Mastectomy or breast conserving surgery? Factors affecting type of surgical treatment for breast cancer - A classification tree approach",
abstract = "Background: A critical choice facing breast cancer patients is which surgical treatment - mastectomy or breast conserving surgery (BCS) - is most appropriate. Several studies have investigated factors that impact the type of surgery chosen, identifying features such as place of residence, age at diagnosis, tumor size, socio-economic and racial/ethnic elements as relevant. Such assessment of {"}propensity{"} is important in understanding issues such as a reported under-utilisation of BCS among women for whom such treatment was not contraindicated. Using Western Australian (WA) data, we further examine the factors associated with the type of surgical treatment for breast cancer using a classification tree approach. This approach deals naturally with complicated interactions between factors, and so allows flexible and interpretable models for treatment choice to be built that add to the current understanding of this complex decision process. Methods: Data was extracted from the WA Cancer Registry on women diagnosed with breast cancer in WA from 1990 to 2000. Subjects' treatment preferences were predicted from covariates using both classification trees and logistic regression. Results: Tumor size was the primary determinant of patient choice, subjects with tumors smaller than 20 mm in diameter preferring BCS. For subjects with tumors greater than 20 mm in diameter factors such as patient age, nodal status, and tumor histology become relevant as predictors of patient choice. Conclusion: Classification trees perform as well as logistic regression for predicting patient choice, but are much easier to interpret for clinical use. The selected tree can inform clinicians' advice to patients.",
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Mastectomy or breast conserving surgery? Factors affecting type of surgical treatment for breast cancer - A classification tree approach. / Martin, Michael A.; Meyricke, Ramona; O'Neill, Terry; Roberts, Steven.

In: BMC Cancer, Vol. 6, 98, 20.04.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Roberts, Steven

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AB - Background: A critical choice facing breast cancer patients is which surgical treatment - mastectomy or breast conserving surgery (BCS) - is most appropriate. Several studies have investigated factors that impact the type of surgery chosen, identifying features such as place of residence, age at diagnosis, tumor size, socio-economic and racial/ethnic elements as relevant. Such assessment of "propensity" is important in understanding issues such as a reported under-utilisation of BCS among women for whom such treatment was not contraindicated. Using Western Australian (WA) data, we further examine the factors associated with the type of surgical treatment for breast cancer using a classification tree approach. This approach deals naturally with complicated interactions between factors, and so allows flexible and interpretable models for treatment choice to be built that add to the current understanding of this complex decision process. Methods: Data was extracted from the WA Cancer Registry on women diagnosed with breast cancer in WA from 1990 to 2000. Subjects' treatment preferences were predicted from covariates using both classification trees and logistic regression. Results: Tumor size was the primary determinant of patient choice, subjects with tumors smaller than 20 mm in diameter preferring BCS. For subjects with tumors greater than 20 mm in diameter factors such as patient age, nodal status, and tumor histology become relevant as predictors of patient choice. Conclusion: Classification trees perform as well as logistic regression for predicting patient choice, but are much easier to interpret for clinical use. The selected tree can inform clinicians' advice to patients.

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