Legal implications for complementary medicine practitioners of the New South Wales Health Practitioner Code of Conduct

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

A number of recent cases in Australia of unprofessional practices by unregistered health practitioners resulting in injury to consumers have revealed the difficulty faced by regulators in not having the discipline provided by a registration board. New South Wales, in enacting a Code of Conduct for Unregistered Health Practitioners under the Public Health Act 2010 (NSW), has applied negative licencing to specify the expectations for professional practice for unregistered health practitioners who are non-compliant with the provision of this Code. If applied sensitively to legitimate practice, this form of regulation will provide cost-effective and not unduly restrictive regulation. South Australia has now applied a similar Code. This form of regulation is of national significance as it is one regulatory option currently being considered at a national level.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)734-746
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Law and Medicine
Volume20
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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New South Wales
Complementary Therapies
Health
South Australia
Professional Practice
Licensure
Public Health
Costs and Cost Analysis
Wounds and Injuries

Cite this

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abstract = "A number of recent cases in Australia of unprofessional practices by unregistered health practitioners resulting in injury to consumers have revealed the difficulty faced by regulators in not having the discipline provided by a registration board. New South Wales, in enacting a Code of Conduct for Unregistered Health Practitioners under the Public Health Act 2010 (NSW), has applied negative licencing to specify the expectations for professional practice for unregistered health practitioners who are non-compliant with the provision of this Code. If applied sensitively to legitimate practice, this form of regulation will provide cost-effective and not unduly restrictive regulation. South Australia has now applied a similar Code. This form of regulation is of national significance as it is one regulatory option currently being considered at a national level.",
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Legal implications for complementary medicine practitioners of the New South Wales Health Practitioner Code of Conduct. / Weir, Michael.

In: Journal of Law and Medicine, Vol. 20, No. 4, 2013, p. 734-746.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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