Leg power as an indicator for risk of injury or illness in police recruits

Rob Marc Orr, Rodney R Pope, Samantha Peterson, Michael Stierli, Benjamin Hinton

Research output: Contribution to conferencePresentationResearch

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Abstract

Question: Does leg power, as measured by a vertical jump, predict injury
and illness risk in a police population?
Design: Retrospective cohort study design.
Participants: New South Wales Police recruits (n=1021) undergoing a basic
police recruit training course.
Intervention A basic police recruit training course of 12 week duration.
Outcome Measures: Vertical Jump (VJ) height and formally reported
illness and injuries.
Results: 15% of participants (n=158, mean±SD VJ =42.03±7.35cm)
reported an injury, 30% (n=296, VJ =41.88±7.48cm) an illness, and 38%
(n=390, VJ =42.07±7.38cm) an illness and/or injury. The mean VJ heights
for each of these groups was significantly lower (p<.005) than those who
did not suffer an injury (VJ =44.00±7.56cm), illness (VJ =44.44±7.47cm)
or a combination of either (VJ =44.69±7.50cm). Correlations between VJ
height and prevalence of illness and injury were low (r=- 0.16 and -0.09,
respectively) but significant (p<.005), with VJ height accounting for 2.6%
and 0.8% of the variance in injury and illness rates, respectively.
Conclusion: Police recruits with lower VJ height are at a significantly
greater risk of suffering an injury or illness during police basic
recruit training.
Key Practice Points:
• Leg power is a useful predictor of injury and illness risk in recruits
undergoing police training and potentially in other tactical populations.
• Increasing leg power in new recruits about to undergo police training my
reduce their risk of injury or illness.
• Further research is required to assess the extent to which leg power is
causal in these relationships.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2015
EventThe Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015: Connect - Gold Coast, Australia
Duration: 3 Oct 20156 Oct 2015
Conference number: 2015
http://www.physiotherapy.asn.au/Conference2015

Conference

ConferenceThe Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015
Abbreviated titleAPA
CountryAustralia
CityGold Coast
Period3/10/156/10/15
Internet address

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Police
Leg
Wounds and Injuries
New South Wales
Population
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Research

Cite this

Orr, R. M., Pope, R. R., Peterson, S., Stierli, M., & Hinton, B. (2015). Leg power as an indicator for risk of injury or illness in police recruits. The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.
Orr, Rob Marc ; Pope, Rodney R ; Peterson, Samantha ; Stierli, Michael ; Hinton, Benjamin. / Leg power as an indicator for risk of injury or illness in police recruits. The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.
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abstract = "Question: Does leg power, as measured by a vertical jump, predict injuryand illness risk in a police population?Design: Retrospective cohort study design.Participants: New South Wales Police recruits (n=1021) undergoing a basicpolice recruit training course.Intervention A basic police recruit training course of 12 week duration.Outcome Measures: Vertical Jump (VJ) height and formally reportedillness and injuries.Results: 15{\%} of participants (n=158, mean±SD VJ =42.03±7.35cm)reported an injury, 30{\%} (n=296, VJ =41.88±7.48cm) an illness, and 38{\%}(n=390, VJ =42.07±7.38cm) an illness and/or injury. The mean VJ heightsfor each of these groups was significantly lower (p<.005) than those whodid not suffer an injury (VJ =44.00±7.56cm), illness (VJ =44.44±7.47cm)or a combination of either (VJ =44.69±7.50cm). Correlations between VJheight and prevalence of illness and injury were low (r=- 0.16 and -0.09,respectively) but significant (p<.005), with VJ height accounting for 2.6{\%}and 0.8{\%} of the variance in injury and illness rates, respectively.Conclusion: Police recruits with lower VJ height are at a significantlygreater risk of suffering an injury or illness during police basicrecruit training.Key Practice Points:• Leg power is a useful predictor of injury and illness risk in recruitsundergoing police training and potentially in other tactical populations.• Increasing leg power in new recruits about to undergo police training myreduce their risk of injury or illness.• Further research is required to assess the extent to which leg power iscausal in these relationships.",
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Orr, RM, Pope, RR, Peterson, S, Stierli, M & Hinton, B 2015, 'Leg power as an indicator for risk of injury or illness in police recruits' The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia, 3/10/15 - 6/10/15, .

Leg power as an indicator for risk of injury or illness in police recruits. / Orr, Rob Marc; Pope, Rodney R; Peterson, Samantha; Stierli, Michael; Hinton, Benjamin.

2015. The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePresentationResearch

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T1 - Leg power as an indicator for risk of injury or illness in police recruits

AU - Orr, Rob Marc

AU - Pope, Rodney R

AU - Peterson, Samantha

AU - Stierli, Michael

AU - Hinton, Benjamin

PY - 2015/10

Y1 - 2015/10

N2 - Question: Does leg power, as measured by a vertical jump, predict injuryand illness risk in a police population?Design: Retrospective cohort study design.Participants: New South Wales Police recruits (n=1021) undergoing a basicpolice recruit training course.Intervention A basic police recruit training course of 12 week duration.Outcome Measures: Vertical Jump (VJ) height and formally reportedillness and injuries.Results: 15% of participants (n=158, mean±SD VJ =42.03±7.35cm)reported an injury, 30% (n=296, VJ =41.88±7.48cm) an illness, and 38%(n=390, VJ =42.07±7.38cm) an illness and/or injury. The mean VJ heightsfor each of these groups was significantly lower (p<.005) than those whodid not suffer an injury (VJ =44.00±7.56cm), illness (VJ =44.44±7.47cm)or a combination of either (VJ =44.69±7.50cm). Correlations between VJheight and prevalence of illness and injury were low (r=- 0.16 and -0.09,respectively) but significant (p<.005), with VJ height accounting for 2.6%and 0.8% of the variance in injury and illness rates, respectively.Conclusion: Police recruits with lower VJ height are at a significantlygreater risk of suffering an injury or illness during police basicrecruit training.Key Practice Points:• Leg power is a useful predictor of injury and illness risk in recruitsundergoing police training and potentially in other tactical populations.• Increasing leg power in new recruits about to undergo police training myreduce their risk of injury or illness.• Further research is required to assess the extent to which leg power iscausal in these relationships.

AB - Question: Does leg power, as measured by a vertical jump, predict injuryand illness risk in a police population?Design: Retrospective cohort study design.Participants: New South Wales Police recruits (n=1021) undergoing a basicpolice recruit training course.Intervention A basic police recruit training course of 12 week duration.Outcome Measures: Vertical Jump (VJ) height and formally reportedillness and injuries.Results: 15% of participants (n=158, mean±SD VJ =42.03±7.35cm)reported an injury, 30% (n=296, VJ =41.88±7.48cm) an illness, and 38%(n=390, VJ =42.07±7.38cm) an illness and/or injury. The mean VJ heightsfor each of these groups was significantly lower (p<.005) than those whodid not suffer an injury (VJ =44.00±7.56cm), illness (VJ =44.44±7.47cm)or a combination of either (VJ =44.69±7.50cm). Correlations between VJheight and prevalence of illness and injury were low (r=- 0.16 and -0.09,respectively) but significant (p<.005), with VJ height accounting for 2.6%and 0.8% of the variance in injury and illness rates, respectively.Conclusion: Police recruits with lower VJ height are at a significantlygreater risk of suffering an injury or illness during police basicrecruit training.Key Practice Points:• Leg power is a useful predictor of injury and illness risk in recruitsundergoing police training and potentially in other tactical populations.• Increasing leg power in new recruits about to undergo police training myreduce their risk of injury or illness.• Further research is required to assess the extent to which leg power iscausal in these relationships.

M3 - Presentation

ER -

Orr RM, Pope RR, Peterson S, Stierli M, Hinton B. Leg power as an indicator for risk of injury or illness in police recruits. 2015. The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.