Left ventricular impaired relaxation and interstitial myocarditis identified in sepsis-associated cardiac dysfunction: Use of a rodent model

David J. Sturgess*, Shannon Morrison, Brian Haluska, Glenda C. Gobe, Mark A. Jones, Sonia Volante, Bala Venkatesh

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Sepsis is a serious clinical problem that results from the systemic response of the body to infection. Left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction is increasingly appreciated as a contributor to morbidity and mortality in sepsis. Animal models may offer a method of studying diastolic dysfunction while controlling for many potential clinical confounders, such as sepsis duration, premorbid condition, and therapeutic interventions. This study sought to evaluate an endotoxemia (LPS) rodent model of sepsis, with regard to echocardiographic evidence, including tissue Doppler, of LV diastolic dysfunction and histopathology findings. 

Material/Methods: Fourteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated (1: 1) to LPS or saline (control). Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was measured through cannulation of the carotid artery. After a 30-min stabilization, baseline assessment with echocardiography and blood collection was performed. Rats were administered 0.9% saline or LPS (10 mg/mL). Follow-up echocardiography and blood collection were performed after 2 h. Hearts were removed post-mortem and pathology studied using histology and immunohistochemistry. 

Results: LPS was associated with hypotension (MAP 81.86±31.67 mmHg; 124.29±20.16; p=0.02) and LV impaired relaxation (myocardial early diastolic velocity [e’] 0.06±0.02 m/s; 0.09±0.02; P=0.008). Histopathology and immunohistochemistry demonstrated evidence of interstitial myocarditis (hydropic changes and inflammation). 

Conclusions: LPS was associated with both diastolic dysfunction (impaired relaxation) and interstitial myocarditis. These features may offer a link between the structural and functional changes that have previously been described separately in clinical sepsis. This may facilitate further studies focused upon the mechanism and potential benefit treatment of sepsis-associated cardiac dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere929512
JournalMedical Science Monitor
Volume27
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Apr 2021
Externally publishedYes

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