Laboratory-and field-based assessment of maximal aerobic power of elite stand-up paddle-board athletes

Ben Schram, Wayne Hing, Mike Climstein

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3 Citations (Scopus)
31 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Purpose: Stand-up paddle boarding (SUP) is a rapidly growing sport and recreational activity for which only anecdotal evidence exists on its proposed health, fitness, and injury-rehabilitation benefits. Participants: 10 internationally and nationally ranked elite SUP athletes. Methods: Participants were assessed for their maximal aerobic power on an ergometer in a laboratory and compared with other water-based athletes. Field-based assessments were subsequently performed using a portable gas-analysis system, and a correlation between the 2 measures was performed. Results: Maximal aerobic power (relative) was significantly higher (P =.037) when measured in the field with a portable gas-analysis system (45.48 ± 6.96 mL • kg-1 • min-1) than with laboratory-based metabolic-cart measurements (43.20 ± 6.67 mL • kg-1 • min-1). There was a strong, positive correlation (r =.907) between laboratory and field maximal aerobic power results. Significantly higher (P =.000) measures of SUP paddling speed were found in the field than with the laboratory ergometer (+42.39%). There were no significant differences in maximal heart rate between the laboratory and field settings (P =.576). Conclusion: The results demonstrate the maximal aerobic power representative of internationally and nationally ranked SUP athletes and show that SUP athletes can be assessed for maximal aerobic power in the laboratory with high correlation to field-based measures. The field-based portable gas-analysis unit has a tendency to consistently measure higher oxygen consumption. Elite SUP athletes display aerobic power outputs similar to those of other upper-limb-dominant elite water-based athletes (surfing, dragon-boat racing, and canoeing).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)28-32
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016

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Athletes
Gases
Ships
Water
Upper Extremity
Oxygen Consumption
Sports
Rehabilitation
Heart Rate
Health
Wounds and Injuries

Cite this

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title = "Laboratory-and field-based assessment of maximal aerobic power of elite stand-up paddle-board athletes",
abstract = "Purpose: Stand-up paddle boarding (SUP) is a rapidly growing sport and recreational activity for which only anecdotal evidence exists on its proposed health, fitness, and injury-rehabilitation benefits. Participants: 10 internationally and nationally ranked elite SUP athletes. Methods: Participants were assessed for their maximal aerobic power on an ergometer in a laboratory and compared with other water-based athletes. Field-based assessments were subsequently performed using a portable gas-analysis system, and a correlation between the 2 measures was performed. Results: Maximal aerobic power (relative) was significantly higher (P =.037) when measured in the field with a portable gas-analysis system (45.48 ± 6.96 mL • kg-1 • min-1) than with laboratory-based metabolic-cart measurements (43.20 ± 6.67 mL • kg-1 • min-1). There was a strong, positive correlation (r =.907) between laboratory and field maximal aerobic power results. Significantly higher (P =.000) measures of SUP paddling speed were found in the field than with the laboratory ergometer (+42.39{\%}). There were no significant differences in maximal heart rate between the laboratory and field settings (P =.576). Conclusion: The results demonstrate the maximal aerobic power representative of internationally and nationally ranked SUP athletes and show that SUP athletes can be assessed for maximal aerobic power in the laboratory with high correlation to field-based measures. The field-based portable gas-analysis unit has a tendency to consistently measure higher oxygen consumption. Elite SUP athletes display aerobic power outputs similar to those of other upper-limb-dominant elite water-based athletes (surfing, dragon-boat racing, and canoeing).",
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Laboratory-and field-based assessment of maximal aerobic power of elite stand-up paddle-board athletes. / Schram, Ben; Hing, Wayne; Climstein, Mike.

In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, Vol. 11, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 28-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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