Is it ethical to prioritize patients for organ allocation according to their values about organ donation?

Katrina Bramstedt*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Because the supply of deceased donor organs fails to meet demand, patients needing a transplant frequently have lengthy waits or die while waiting. In an effort to reduce waiting times, the concept of "preferred status" has emerged. In the United States, preferred status has taken the form of a community of individuals called LifeSharers. Using directed donation, this group aims to facilitate priority organ allocation to its members-people who have agreed to be organ donors. Such preferred status programs increase societal awareness about organ donation and transplantation, but they are not without ethical controversy, as some term them "clubs." In the case of LifeSharers, the potential to increase the pool of deceased donor organs is a worthy goal that would benefit the community of patients awaiting transplantation, not just LifeSharers members.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)170-174
Number of pages5
JournalProgress in Transplantation
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2006
Externally publishedYes

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