Is culture important in the choice of role models? Experiences from a culturally diverse medical school

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17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a multicultural student population at a South African medical school, for over one-third of students (Years 1-5) undertaking a traditional curriculum, culture was an important consideration in their choice of a role model. This was particularly so for senior students, perhaps reflecting their relatively recent exposure to patients and their forthcoming internship. Some student comments might, however, be interpreted as reflecting a rigid perception of culture that could translate into a possible lack of respect for others cultures. It is therefore imperative that each institution provide appropriate early and continous mainstream diversity training, as well as identify role models to match the student profile. With the increasing diversity of students globally, this issue of culture should assume even greater importance in medical education that it is currently afforded.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)142-149
Number of pages8
JournalMedical Teacher
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2004
Externally publishedYes

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role model
Medical Schools
Students
school
experience
student
internship
Internship and Residency
Medical Education
Curriculum
respect
curriculum
lack
Population
education

Cite this

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Is culture important in the choice of role models? Experiences from a culturally diverse medical school. / Mclean, Michelle.

In: Medical Teacher, Vol. 26, No. 2, 01.03.2004, p. 142-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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