Iodine-induced neonatal hypothyroidism secondary to maternal seaweed consumption: A common practice in some Asian cultures to promote breast milk supply

Phillip John Emder, Michelle Marion Jack*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mild iodine deficiency is a recognised problem in Australia and New Zealand. However, iodine excess can cause hypothyroidism in some infants. We highlight two cases which illustrate the risks of excess dietary iodine intake during pregnancy and breastfeeding. They also describe a cultural practice of consuming seaweed soup to promote breast milk supply. Although most attention recently has been on the inadequacy of iodine in Australian diets, the reverse situation should not be overlooked. Neither feast nor famine is desirable.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)750-752
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Volume47
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Iodine-induced neonatal hypothyroidism secondary to maternal seaweed consumption: A common practice in some Asian cultures to promote breast milk supply'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this