Interventions for stroke rehabilitation: Analysis of the research contained in the OTseeker evidence database

Tammy Hoffmann, Sally Bennett, Kryss McKenna, Julie Green-Hill, Annie McCluskey, Leigh Tooth

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterResearchpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To analyse the stroke content in OTseeker in terms of the quantity of the research evidence, the quality of the randomised controlled trials (RCTs), and the types of interventions and outcome measures used. Method: A survey of stroke-related content in the OTseeker database was conducted in 2007. The year of publication and intervention categories used in each stroke-related RCT and systematic review (SR) were recorded. The internal validity of RCTs using the PEDro scale (partitioned) and the outcome measures used were also recorded. Results: Of the 4,369 articles indexed on OTseeker, 452 (10.3%) related to stroke were conducted between 1979 and 2006. The five most frequently studied intervention categories were movement training (43.2%), models of service delivery (31.2%), physical modalities/orthotics/splinting (30.1%), exercise/stretching/strength training (19.5%), and skill acquisition/training (9.3%). Random allocation (96.1%) was the most frequently satisfied internal validity criterion and therapist blinding (3.1%) was least often satisfied. The five most frequently used outcome measurement categories were basic and extended activities of daily living (70.1%), hand and upper limb function (56.1%), walking/gait (44.1%), movement/motor function (32.7%), and quality of life/general overall health (27.9%). Conclusion: The stroke-related content on OTseeker is useful for allied health professionals. This study highlights a need for better definitions of interventions and consensus about the best outcome measures. Few interventions or outcome measures were participation focused.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)341-350
Number of pages10
JournalTopics in Stroke Rehabilitation
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Hoffmann, Tammy ; Bennett, Sally ; McKenna, Kryss ; Green-Hill, Julie ; McCluskey, Annie ; Tooth, Leigh. / Interventions for stroke rehabilitation : Analysis of the research contained in the OTseeker evidence database. In: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation. 2008 ; Vol. 15, No. 4. pp. 341-350.
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abstract = "Purpose: To analyse the stroke content in OTseeker in terms of the quantity of the research evidence, the quality of the randomised controlled trials (RCTs), and the types of interventions and outcome measures used. Method: A survey of stroke-related content in the OTseeker database was conducted in 2007. The year of publication and intervention categories used in each stroke-related RCT and systematic review (SR) were recorded. The internal validity of RCTs using the PEDro scale (partitioned) and the outcome measures used were also recorded. Results: Of the 4,369 articles indexed on OTseeker, 452 (10.3{\%}) related to stroke were conducted between 1979 and 2006. The five most frequently studied intervention categories were movement training (43.2{\%}), models of service delivery (31.2{\%}), physical modalities/orthotics/splinting (30.1{\%}), exercise/stretching/strength training (19.5{\%}), and skill acquisition/training (9.3{\%}). Random allocation (96.1{\%}) was the most frequently satisfied internal validity criterion and therapist blinding (3.1{\%}) was least often satisfied. The five most frequently used outcome measurement categories were basic and extended activities of daily living (70.1{\%}), hand and upper limb function (56.1{\%}), walking/gait (44.1{\%}), movement/motor function (32.7{\%}), and quality of life/general overall health (27.9{\%}). Conclusion: The stroke-related content on OTseeker is useful for allied health professionals. This study highlights a need for better definitions of interventions and consensus about the best outcome measures. Few interventions or outcome measures were participation focused.",
author = "Tammy Hoffmann and Sally Bennett and Kryss McKenna and Julie Green-Hill and Annie McCluskey and Leigh Tooth",
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Interventions for stroke rehabilitation : Analysis of the research contained in the OTseeker evidence database. / Hoffmann, Tammy; Bennett, Sally; McKenna, Kryss; Green-Hill, Julie; McCluskey, Annie; Tooth, Leigh.

In: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, Vol. 15, No. 4, 2008, p. 341-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Interventions for stroke rehabilitation

T2 - Analysis of the research contained in the OTseeker evidence database

AU - Hoffmann, Tammy

AU - Bennett, Sally

AU - McKenna, Kryss

AU - Green-Hill, Julie

AU - McCluskey, Annie

AU - Tooth, Leigh

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Purpose: To analyse the stroke content in OTseeker in terms of the quantity of the research evidence, the quality of the randomised controlled trials (RCTs), and the types of interventions and outcome measures used. Method: A survey of stroke-related content in the OTseeker database was conducted in 2007. The year of publication and intervention categories used in each stroke-related RCT and systematic review (SR) were recorded. The internal validity of RCTs using the PEDro scale (partitioned) and the outcome measures used were also recorded. Results: Of the 4,369 articles indexed on OTseeker, 452 (10.3%) related to stroke were conducted between 1979 and 2006. The five most frequently studied intervention categories were movement training (43.2%), models of service delivery (31.2%), physical modalities/orthotics/splinting (30.1%), exercise/stretching/strength training (19.5%), and skill acquisition/training (9.3%). Random allocation (96.1%) was the most frequently satisfied internal validity criterion and therapist blinding (3.1%) was least often satisfied. The five most frequently used outcome measurement categories were basic and extended activities of daily living (70.1%), hand and upper limb function (56.1%), walking/gait (44.1%), movement/motor function (32.7%), and quality of life/general overall health (27.9%). Conclusion: The stroke-related content on OTseeker is useful for allied health professionals. This study highlights a need for better definitions of interventions and consensus about the best outcome measures. Few interventions or outcome measures were participation focused.

AB - Purpose: To analyse the stroke content in OTseeker in terms of the quantity of the research evidence, the quality of the randomised controlled trials (RCTs), and the types of interventions and outcome measures used. Method: A survey of stroke-related content in the OTseeker database was conducted in 2007. The year of publication and intervention categories used in each stroke-related RCT and systematic review (SR) were recorded. The internal validity of RCTs using the PEDro scale (partitioned) and the outcome measures used were also recorded. Results: Of the 4,369 articles indexed on OTseeker, 452 (10.3%) related to stroke were conducted between 1979 and 2006. The five most frequently studied intervention categories were movement training (43.2%), models of service delivery (31.2%), physical modalities/orthotics/splinting (30.1%), exercise/stretching/strength training (19.5%), and skill acquisition/training (9.3%). Random allocation (96.1%) was the most frequently satisfied internal validity criterion and therapist blinding (3.1%) was least often satisfied. The five most frequently used outcome measurement categories were basic and extended activities of daily living (70.1%), hand and upper limb function (56.1%), walking/gait (44.1%), movement/motor function (32.7%), and quality of life/general overall health (27.9%). Conclusion: The stroke-related content on OTseeker is useful for allied health professionals. This study highlights a need for better definitions of interventions and consensus about the best outcome measures. Few interventions or outcome measures were participation focused.

U2 - 10.1310/tsr1504-341

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M3 - Letter

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JO - Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation

JF - Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation

SN - 1074-9357

IS - 4

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