Internet data mining

Kuldeep Kumar, John E Baker

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Data mining has emerged as one of the hottest topics in recent years. It is an extraordinarily broad area and is growing in several directions. With the advancement of the Internet and cheap availability of powerful computers, data is flooding the market at a tremendous pace. However, the technology for navigating, exploring, visualizing and summarizing large databases are still in their infancy. The quantity and diversity of data available to make decisions has increased dramatically during the past decade. Large databases are being built to hold and deliver these data. Data mining is defined as the process of seeking interesting or valuable information within large data sets. Some examples of data mining applications in the area of management science are analysis of direct-mailing strategies, sales data analysis for customer segmentation, credit card fraud detection, mass customization, etc. With the advancement of the Internet and World Wide Web, both management scientists and interested end-users can get large data sets for their research from this source. The Web not only contains a vast amount of useful information, but also provides a powerful infrastructure for communication and information sharing. For example, Ma, Liu and Wong (2000) have developed a system called DS-Web that uses the Web to help data mining. A recent survey on Web mining research can be seen in the paper by Kosala and Blockeel (2000).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternet Management Issues
Subtitle of host publicationA Global Perspective
EditorsJohn D Haynes
PublisherIGI Global
Chapter15
Pages236-253
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9781591400158
ISBN (Print)1-930708-21-1, 9781930708211
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

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Data mining
Internet
Management science
World Wide Web
Sales
Availability
Communication

Cite this

Kumar, K., & Baker, J. E. (2001). Internet data mining. In J. D. Haynes (Ed.), Internet Management Issues: A Global Perspective (pp. 236-253). IGI Global. https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-930708-21-1.ch015
Kumar, Kuldeep ; Baker, John E. / Internet data mining. Internet Management Issues: A Global Perspective. editor / John D Haynes. IGI Global, 2001. pp. 236-253
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Kumar, K & Baker, JE 2001, Internet data mining. in JD Haynes (ed.), Internet Management Issues: A Global Perspective. IGI Global, pp. 236-253. https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-930708-21-1.ch015

Internet data mining. / Kumar, Kuldeep; Baker, John E.

Internet Management Issues: A Global Perspective. ed. / John D Haynes. IGI Global, 2001. p. 236-253.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

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Kumar K, Baker JE. Internet data mining. In Haynes JD, editor, Internet Management Issues: A Global Perspective. IGI Global. 2001. p. 236-253 https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-930708-21-1.ch015