Integrating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health across an undergraduate medical curriculum in Australia

Janie Dade Smith, Shannon Springer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

6 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Introduction
Many Australian university medical schools have struggled over the past decade to implement the professional standards and guidelines in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health into their already crowded curricula. Bond University was no exception – with good intent but mixed results. In 2012 Bond renewed it medical program curricula and developed an innovative Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health education program, which is experiencing great success.
Methodology
The methodology included: establishing an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health group (n=9); undertaking an extensive mapping process of the learning outcomes (n=63) from the standards and guidelines set by the profession; fleshing out the content which was allocated to years, semesters, and cases; developing an innovative implementation process based on a set of principles, and using structured program evaluation and a 5 year longitudinal study to measure the impact.
Results
Bond are now in their fifth year of implementing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health education with an innovative program that includes cultural immersion in the first year, problem based learning through identified cases, innovative processes for teaching difficult issues such as racism, as well as a structured assessment processes.
Conclusion
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health is a well-integrated and accepted part of the normal medical curriculum and assessment process. Employing the right people, undertaking the extensive mapping process, having a documented implementation plan that all staff and students understood and accepted, based on the standards and guidelines of the profession, supported by strong leadership was critical for success.
Original languageEnglish
Article number5
JournalAustralian Journal of Clinical Education
Volume1
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

curriculum
health
health promotion
profession
learning
racism
semester
longitudinal study
leadership
staff
university
methodology
Teaching
evaluation
school
Group
student

Cite this

@article{9a8ba4a1e59e46da81adf23e5bfebcd5,
title = "Integrating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health across an undergraduate medical curriculum in Australia",
abstract = "IntroductionMany Australian university medical schools have struggled over the past decade to implement the professional standards and guidelines in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health into their already crowded curricula. Bond University was no exception – with good intent but mixed results. In 2012 Bond renewed it medical program curricula and developed an innovative Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health education program, which is experiencing great success.MethodologyThe methodology included: establishing an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health group (n=9); undertaking an extensive mapping process of the learning outcomes (n=63) from the standards and guidelines set by the profession; fleshing out the content which was allocated to years, semesters, and cases; developing an innovative implementation process based on a set of principles, and using structured program evaluation and a 5 year longitudinal study to measure the impact.ResultsBond are now in their fifth year of implementing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health education with an innovative program that includes cultural immersion in the first year, problem based learning through identified cases, innovative processes for teaching difficult issues such as racism, as well as a structured assessment processes.ConclusionAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health is a well-integrated and accepted part of the normal medical curriculum and assessment process. Employing the right people, undertaking the extensive mapping process, having a documented implementation plan that all staff and students understood and accepted, based on the standards and guidelines of the profession, supported by strong leadership was critical for success.",
author = "Smith, {Janie Dade} and Shannon Springer",
year = "2016",
language = "English",
volume = "1",
journal = "Australian Journal of Clinical Education",
issn = "2207-4791",
number = "5",

}

Integrating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health across an undergraduate medical curriculum in Australia. / Smith, Janie Dade; Springer, Shannon.

In: Australian Journal of Clinical Education, Vol. 1, No. 5, 5, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Integrating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health across an undergraduate medical curriculum in Australia

AU - Smith, Janie Dade

AU - Springer, Shannon

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - IntroductionMany Australian university medical schools have struggled over the past decade to implement the professional standards and guidelines in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health into their already crowded curricula. Bond University was no exception – with good intent but mixed results. In 2012 Bond renewed it medical program curricula and developed an innovative Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health education program, which is experiencing great success.MethodologyThe methodology included: establishing an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health group (n=9); undertaking an extensive mapping process of the learning outcomes (n=63) from the standards and guidelines set by the profession; fleshing out the content which was allocated to years, semesters, and cases; developing an innovative implementation process based on a set of principles, and using structured program evaluation and a 5 year longitudinal study to measure the impact.ResultsBond are now in their fifth year of implementing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health education with an innovative program that includes cultural immersion in the first year, problem based learning through identified cases, innovative processes for teaching difficult issues such as racism, as well as a structured assessment processes.ConclusionAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health is a well-integrated and accepted part of the normal medical curriculum and assessment process. Employing the right people, undertaking the extensive mapping process, having a documented implementation plan that all staff and students understood and accepted, based on the standards and guidelines of the profession, supported by strong leadership was critical for success.

AB - IntroductionMany Australian university medical schools have struggled over the past decade to implement the professional standards and guidelines in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health into their already crowded curricula. Bond University was no exception – with good intent but mixed results. In 2012 Bond renewed it medical program curricula and developed an innovative Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health education program, which is experiencing great success.MethodologyThe methodology included: establishing an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health group (n=9); undertaking an extensive mapping process of the learning outcomes (n=63) from the standards and guidelines set by the profession; fleshing out the content which was allocated to years, semesters, and cases; developing an innovative implementation process based on a set of principles, and using structured program evaluation and a 5 year longitudinal study to measure the impact.ResultsBond are now in their fifth year of implementing the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health education with an innovative program that includes cultural immersion in the first year, problem based learning through identified cases, innovative processes for teaching difficult issues such as racism, as well as a structured assessment processes.ConclusionAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health is a well-integrated and accepted part of the normal medical curriculum and assessment process. Employing the right people, undertaking the extensive mapping process, having a documented implementation plan that all staff and students understood and accepted, based on the standards and guidelines of the profession, supported by strong leadership was critical for success.

M3 - Article

VL - 1

JO - Australian Journal of Clinical Education

JF - Australian Journal of Clinical Education

SN - 2207-4791

IS - 5

M1 - 5

ER -