Instance of misrepresentation: James (2005)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

James (2005) misrepresented and misinterpreted several aspects of the report by Lyvers, Brooks, and Matica (2004) on cognitive and psychophysiological effects of caffeine. Lyvers et al. did not claim that an alcohol breath test is a test of caffeine levels. The apparent enhancement effect of caffeine on neuropsychological performance, obtained in light users but not heavy users, was unlikely to be accounted for by reversal of withdrawal-induced deficits.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-118
Number of pages2
JournalAustralian Journal of Psychology
Volume61
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2009

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Caffeine
Breath Tests
Alcohols
Light

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abstract = "James (2005) misrepresented and misinterpreted several aspects of the report by Lyvers, Brooks, and Matica (2004) on cognitive and psychophysiological effects of caffeine. Lyvers et al. did not claim that an alcohol breath test is a test of caffeine levels. The apparent enhancement effect of caffeine on neuropsychological performance, obtained in light users but not heavy users, was unlikely to be accounted for by reversal of withdrawal-induced deficits.",
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Instance of misrepresentation : James (2005). / Lyvers, Michael.

In: Australian Journal of Psychology, Vol. 61, No. 2, 07.2009, p. 117-118.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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