Influence of post-exercise hypoxic exposure on hepcidin response in athletes

Claire E. Badenhorst, Brian Dawson, Carmel Goodman, Marc Sim, Gregory R. Cox, Christopher J. Gore, Harold Tjalsma, Dorine W. Swinkels, Peter Peeling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To assess the influence of a simulated altitude exposure (~2,900 m above sea level) for a 3 h recovery period following intense interval running on post-exercise inflammation, serum iron, ferritin, erythropoietin, and hepcidin response. Methods: In a cross-over design, ten well-trained male endurance athletes completed two 8 × 3 min interval running sessions at 85 % of their maximal aerobic velocity on a motorized treadmill, before being randomly assigned to either a hypoxic (HYP: F IO2 ~0.1513) or a normoxic (NORM: F IO2 0.2093) 3 h recovery period. Venous blood was collected pre- and immediately post-exercise, and after 3 and 24 h of recovery. Blood was analyzed for interleukin-6, serum iron, ferritin, erythropoietin, and hepcidin. Results: Interleukin-6 was significantly elevated (p < 0.01) immediately post-exercise compared to baseline (NORM: 1.08 ± 0.061 to 3.12 ± 1.80) (HYP: 1.32 ± 0.86 to 2.99 ± 2.02), but was not different between conditions. Hepcidin levels were significantly elevated (p < 0.01) at 3 h post-exercise for both conditions when compared to baseline (NORM: 3.25 ± 1.23 to 7.40 ± 4.00) (HYP: 3.24 ± 1.94 to 5.42 ± 3.20), but were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in the HYP trial compared to NORM. No significant differences existed between HYP and NORM for erythropoietin, serum iron, or ferritin. Conclusion: Simulated altitude exposure (~2,900 m) for 3 h following intense interval running attenuates the peak hepcidin levels recorded at 3 h post-exercise. Consequently, a hypoxic recovery after exercise may be useful for athletes with compromised iron status to potentially increase acute dietary iron absorption.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)951-959
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology
Volume114
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hepcidins
Athletes
Exercise
Ferritins
Iron
Erythropoietin
Running
Interleukin-6
Serum
Dietary Iron
Oceans and Seas
Cross-Over Studies
Inflammation

Cite this

Badenhorst, Claire E. ; Dawson, Brian ; Goodman, Carmel ; Sim, Marc ; Cox, Gregory R. ; Gore, Christopher J. ; Tjalsma, Harold ; Swinkels, Dorine W. ; Peeling, Peter. / Influence of post-exercise hypoxic exposure on hepcidin response in athletes. In: European Journal of Applied Physiology. 2014 ; Vol. 114, No. 5. pp. 951-959.
@article{0c0c7ab9a1ce4abfb2d8612d6d5ec8fe,
title = "Influence of post-exercise hypoxic exposure on hepcidin response in athletes",
abstract = "Purpose: To assess the influence of a simulated altitude exposure (~2,900 m above sea level) for a 3 h recovery period following intense interval running on post-exercise inflammation, serum iron, ferritin, erythropoietin, and hepcidin response. Methods: In a cross-over design, ten well-trained male endurance athletes completed two 8 × 3 min interval running sessions at 85 {\%} of their maximal aerobic velocity on a motorized treadmill, before being randomly assigned to either a hypoxic (HYP: F IO2 ~0.1513) or a normoxic (NORM: F IO2 0.2093) 3 h recovery period. Venous blood was collected pre- and immediately post-exercise, and after 3 and 24 h of recovery. Blood was analyzed for interleukin-6, serum iron, ferritin, erythropoietin, and hepcidin. Results: Interleukin-6 was significantly elevated (p < 0.01) immediately post-exercise compared to baseline (NORM: 1.08 ± 0.061 to 3.12 ± 1.80) (HYP: 1.32 ± 0.86 to 2.99 ± 2.02), but was not different between conditions. Hepcidin levels were significantly elevated (p < 0.01) at 3 h post-exercise for both conditions when compared to baseline (NORM: 3.25 ± 1.23 to 7.40 ± 4.00) (HYP: 3.24 ± 1.94 to 5.42 ± 3.20), but were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in the HYP trial compared to NORM. No significant differences existed between HYP and NORM for erythropoietin, serum iron, or ferritin. Conclusion: Simulated altitude exposure (~2,900 m) for 3 h following intense interval running attenuates the peak hepcidin levels recorded at 3 h post-exercise. Consequently, a hypoxic recovery after exercise may be useful for athletes with compromised iron status to potentially increase acute dietary iron absorption.",
author = "Badenhorst, {Claire E.} and Brian Dawson and Carmel Goodman and Marc Sim and Cox, {Gregory R.} and Gore, {Christopher J.} and Harold Tjalsma and Swinkels, {Dorine W.} and Peter Peeling",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00421-014-2829-6",
language = "English",
volume = "114",
pages = "951--959",
journal = "Arbeitsphysiologie",
issn = "1439-6319",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "5",

}

Badenhorst, CE, Dawson, B, Goodman, C, Sim, M, Cox, GR, Gore, CJ, Tjalsma, H, Swinkels, DW & Peeling, P 2014, 'Influence of post-exercise hypoxic exposure on hepcidin response in athletes' European Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 114, no. 5, pp. 951-959. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-014-2829-6

Influence of post-exercise hypoxic exposure on hepcidin response in athletes. / Badenhorst, Claire E.; Dawson, Brian; Goodman, Carmel; Sim, Marc; Cox, Gregory R.; Gore, Christopher J.; Tjalsma, Harold; Swinkels, Dorine W.; Peeling, Peter.

In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 114, No. 5, 01.01.2014, p. 951-959.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of post-exercise hypoxic exposure on hepcidin response in athletes

AU - Badenhorst, Claire E.

AU - Dawson, Brian

AU - Goodman, Carmel

AU - Sim, Marc

AU - Cox, Gregory R.

AU - Gore, Christopher J.

AU - Tjalsma, Harold

AU - Swinkels, Dorine W.

AU - Peeling, Peter

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Purpose: To assess the influence of a simulated altitude exposure (~2,900 m above sea level) for a 3 h recovery period following intense interval running on post-exercise inflammation, serum iron, ferritin, erythropoietin, and hepcidin response. Methods: In a cross-over design, ten well-trained male endurance athletes completed two 8 × 3 min interval running sessions at 85 % of their maximal aerobic velocity on a motorized treadmill, before being randomly assigned to either a hypoxic (HYP: F IO2 ~0.1513) or a normoxic (NORM: F IO2 0.2093) 3 h recovery period. Venous blood was collected pre- and immediately post-exercise, and after 3 and 24 h of recovery. Blood was analyzed for interleukin-6, serum iron, ferritin, erythropoietin, and hepcidin. Results: Interleukin-6 was significantly elevated (p < 0.01) immediately post-exercise compared to baseline (NORM: 1.08 ± 0.061 to 3.12 ± 1.80) (HYP: 1.32 ± 0.86 to 2.99 ± 2.02), but was not different between conditions. Hepcidin levels were significantly elevated (p < 0.01) at 3 h post-exercise for both conditions when compared to baseline (NORM: 3.25 ± 1.23 to 7.40 ± 4.00) (HYP: 3.24 ± 1.94 to 5.42 ± 3.20), but were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in the HYP trial compared to NORM. No significant differences existed between HYP and NORM for erythropoietin, serum iron, or ferritin. Conclusion: Simulated altitude exposure (~2,900 m) for 3 h following intense interval running attenuates the peak hepcidin levels recorded at 3 h post-exercise. Consequently, a hypoxic recovery after exercise may be useful for athletes with compromised iron status to potentially increase acute dietary iron absorption.

AB - Purpose: To assess the influence of a simulated altitude exposure (~2,900 m above sea level) for a 3 h recovery period following intense interval running on post-exercise inflammation, serum iron, ferritin, erythropoietin, and hepcidin response. Methods: In a cross-over design, ten well-trained male endurance athletes completed two 8 × 3 min interval running sessions at 85 % of their maximal aerobic velocity on a motorized treadmill, before being randomly assigned to either a hypoxic (HYP: F IO2 ~0.1513) or a normoxic (NORM: F IO2 0.2093) 3 h recovery period. Venous blood was collected pre- and immediately post-exercise, and after 3 and 24 h of recovery. Blood was analyzed for interleukin-6, serum iron, ferritin, erythropoietin, and hepcidin. Results: Interleukin-6 was significantly elevated (p < 0.01) immediately post-exercise compared to baseline (NORM: 1.08 ± 0.061 to 3.12 ± 1.80) (HYP: 1.32 ± 0.86 to 2.99 ± 2.02), but was not different between conditions. Hepcidin levels were significantly elevated (p < 0.01) at 3 h post-exercise for both conditions when compared to baseline (NORM: 3.25 ± 1.23 to 7.40 ± 4.00) (HYP: 3.24 ± 1.94 to 5.42 ± 3.20), but were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in the HYP trial compared to NORM. No significant differences existed between HYP and NORM for erythropoietin, serum iron, or ferritin. Conclusion: Simulated altitude exposure (~2,900 m) for 3 h following intense interval running attenuates the peak hepcidin levels recorded at 3 h post-exercise. Consequently, a hypoxic recovery after exercise may be useful for athletes with compromised iron status to potentially increase acute dietary iron absorption.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84899654489&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00421-014-2829-6

DO - 10.1007/s00421-014-2829-6

M3 - Article

VL - 114

SP - 951

EP - 959

JO - Arbeitsphysiologie

JF - Arbeitsphysiologie

SN - 1439-6319

IS - 5

ER -