Influence of inpatient dietary restriction and post-discharge dietary fibre intake on recovery from acute uncomplicated diverticulitis

Sophie Mahoney, Megan Crichton, Julie Jenkins-Chapman, Romina Nucera, Camilla Dahl, Skye Marshall

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearch

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Abstract

Background/objectives:
To assess the impact of inpatient dietary prescription and dietary fibre intake
post-discharge on healthcare use and gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with acute, uncomplicated diverticulitis.
Methods:
Prospective observational study comparing inpatient restricted diet (n=31) and
liberalised diet (n=29) of patients admitted to Robina Hospital, and low fibre diet (n=39) with high fibre diet (n=6) 30 days post-discharge. The primary outcome
was length of stay for assessing the impact of inpatient diet prescription. Outcomes for assessing the effect of outpatient diet were gastrointestinal
symptoms, readmission, reoccurrence and GP visits.
Results:
The mean length of stay for the restricted diet group was 4.02±1.10 days and 2.86±1.32 for the liberalised diet group (p=0.001). In a multiple regression analysis, when accounting for confounding variables, compared to a restricted diet, a liberalised diet had a significantly decreased length of stay of 0.91 days (95% CI: -1.714 to -0.119; p=0.02). There were no significant differences in
readmission, reoccurrence, GP visits and gastrointestinal symptoms between outpatient diet groups 30 days post-discharge. At 6 months postdischarge
there were no significant differences in readmission for both inpatient and outpatient diet groups.
Conclusion:
This study found that a liberalised diet is associated with a shorter hospital length of stay compared to a restricted diet in patients with acute, uncomplicated diverticulitis. It has also been shown that a liberalised diet is safe in terms of diverticulitis reoccurrence, hospital readmission and gastrointestinal symptoms. This study was unable to support the efficacy of a high fibre diet in the management and prevention of diverticular disease.
Original languageEnglish
Pages38
Publication statusPublished - 2018
EventThe Gold Coast Health Research Week 2018 - Gold Coast, Australia
Duration: 14 Nov 201815 Nov 2018
https://www.goldcoast.health.qld.gov.au/research/researchers/research-week

Conference

ConferenceThe Gold Coast Health Research Week 2018
CountryAustralia
CityGold Coast
Period14/11/1815/11/18
OtherThe annual Gold Coast Health Research Week Conference was held on Wednesday 14 and Thursday 15 November at Gold Coast University Hospital, as part of Research and Quality Week.

Attendees included a diverse mix of our staff and university partners, and highlights were lightning talk sessions, a university partnerships evening, and interstate/international guest presentations for our keynote and Medical Grand Rounds.

The event culminated in a closing session celebrating our annual grant scheme recipients and conference award winners.
Internet address

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Diverticulitis
Dietary Fiber
Inpatients
Diet
Length of Stay
Outpatients
Prescriptions
Patient Readmission
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)

Cite this

Mahoney, S., Crichton, M., Jenkins-Chapman, J., Nucera, R., Dahl, C., & Marshall, S. (2018). Influence of inpatient dietary restriction and post-discharge dietary fibre intake on recovery from acute uncomplicated diverticulitis. 38. Abstract from The Gold Coast Health Research Week 2018, Gold Coast, Australia.
Mahoney, Sophie ; Crichton, Megan ; Jenkins-Chapman, Julie ; Nucera, Romina ; Dahl, Camilla ; Marshall, Skye. / Influence of inpatient dietary restriction and post-discharge dietary fibre intake on recovery from acute uncomplicated diverticulitis. Abstract from The Gold Coast Health Research Week 2018, Gold Coast, Australia.
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abstract = "Background/objectives: To assess the impact of inpatient dietary prescription and dietary fibre intakepost-discharge on healthcare use and gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with acute, uncomplicated diverticulitis. Methods: Prospective observational study comparing inpatient restricted diet (n=31) andliberalised diet (n=29) of patients admitted to Robina Hospital, and low fibre diet (n=39) with high fibre diet (n=6) 30 days post-discharge. The primary outcomewas length of stay for assessing the impact of inpatient diet prescription. Outcomes for assessing the effect of outpatient diet were gastrointestinalsymptoms, readmission, reoccurrence and GP visits.Results: The mean length of stay for the restricted diet group was 4.02±1.10 days and 2.86±1.32 for the liberalised diet group (p=0.001). In a multiple regression analysis, when accounting for confounding variables, compared to a restricted diet, a liberalised diet had a significantly decreased length of stay of 0.91 days (95{\%} CI: -1.714 to -0.119; p=0.02). There were no significant differences inreadmission, reoccurrence, GP visits and gastrointestinal symptoms between outpatient diet groups 30 days post-discharge. At 6 months postdischargethere were no significant differences in readmission for both inpatient and outpatient diet groups.Conclusion: This study found that a liberalised diet is associated with a shorter hospital length of stay compared to a restricted diet in patients with acute, uncomplicated diverticulitis. It has also been shown that a liberalised diet is safe in terms of diverticulitis reoccurrence, hospital readmission and gastrointestinal symptoms. This study was unable to support the efficacy of a high fibre diet in the management and prevention of diverticular disease.",
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Mahoney, S, Crichton, M, Jenkins-Chapman, J, Nucera, R, Dahl, C & Marshall, S 2018, 'Influence of inpatient dietary restriction and post-discharge dietary fibre intake on recovery from acute uncomplicated diverticulitis' The Gold Coast Health Research Week 2018, Gold Coast, Australia, 14/11/18 - 15/11/18, pp. 38.

Influence of inpatient dietary restriction and post-discharge dietary fibre intake on recovery from acute uncomplicated diverticulitis. / Mahoney, Sophie; Crichton, Megan; Jenkins-Chapman, Julie; Nucera, Romina; Dahl, Camilla ; Marshall, Skye.

2018. 38 Abstract from The Gold Coast Health Research Week 2018, Gold Coast, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearch

TY - CONF

T1 - Influence of inpatient dietary restriction and post-discharge dietary fibre intake on recovery from acute uncomplicated diverticulitis

AU - Mahoney, Sophie

AU - Crichton, Megan

AU - Jenkins-Chapman, Julie

AU - Nucera, Romina

AU - Dahl, Camilla

AU - Marshall, Skye

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Background/objectives: To assess the impact of inpatient dietary prescription and dietary fibre intakepost-discharge on healthcare use and gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with acute, uncomplicated diverticulitis. Methods: Prospective observational study comparing inpatient restricted diet (n=31) andliberalised diet (n=29) of patients admitted to Robina Hospital, and low fibre diet (n=39) with high fibre diet (n=6) 30 days post-discharge. The primary outcomewas length of stay for assessing the impact of inpatient diet prescription. Outcomes for assessing the effect of outpatient diet were gastrointestinalsymptoms, readmission, reoccurrence and GP visits.Results: The mean length of stay for the restricted diet group was 4.02±1.10 days and 2.86±1.32 for the liberalised diet group (p=0.001). In a multiple regression analysis, when accounting for confounding variables, compared to a restricted diet, a liberalised diet had a significantly decreased length of stay of 0.91 days (95% CI: -1.714 to -0.119; p=0.02). There were no significant differences inreadmission, reoccurrence, GP visits and gastrointestinal symptoms between outpatient diet groups 30 days post-discharge. At 6 months postdischargethere were no significant differences in readmission for both inpatient and outpatient diet groups.Conclusion: This study found that a liberalised diet is associated with a shorter hospital length of stay compared to a restricted diet in patients with acute, uncomplicated diverticulitis. It has also been shown that a liberalised diet is safe in terms of diverticulitis reoccurrence, hospital readmission and gastrointestinal symptoms. This study was unable to support the efficacy of a high fibre diet in the management and prevention of diverticular disease.

AB - Background/objectives: To assess the impact of inpatient dietary prescription and dietary fibre intakepost-discharge on healthcare use and gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with acute, uncomplicated diverticulitis. Methods: Prospective observational study comparing inpatient restricted diet (n=31) andliberalised diet (n=29) of patients admitted to Robina Hospital, and low fibre diet (n=39) with high fibre diet (n=6) 30 days post-discharge. The primary outcomewas length of stay for assessing the impact of inpatient diet prescription. Outcomes for assessing the effect of outpatient diet were gastrointestinalsymptoms, readmission, reoccurrence and GP visits.Results: The mean length of stay for the restricted diet group was 4.02±1.10 days and 2.86±1.32 for the liberalised diet group (p=0.001). In a multiple regression analysis, when accounting for confounding variables, compared to a restricted diet, a liberalised diet had a significantly decreased length of stay of 0.91 days (95% CI: -1.714 to -0.119; p=0.02). There were no significant differences inreadmission, reoccurrence, GP visits and gastrointestinal symptoms between outpatient diet groups 30 days post-discharge. At 6 months postdischargethere were no significant differences in readmission for both inpatient and outpatient diet groups.Conclusion: This study found that a liberalised diet is associated with a shorter hospital length of stay compared to a restricted diet in patients with acute, uncomplicated diverticulitis. It has also been shown that a liberalised diet is safe in terms of diverticulitis reoccurrence, hospital readmission and gastrointestinal symptoms. This study was unable to support the efficacy of a high fibre diet in the management and prevention of diverticular disease.

M3 - Abstract

SP - 38

ER -

Mahoney S, Crichton M, Jenkins-Chapman J, Nucera R, Dahl C, Marshall S. Influence of inpatient dietary restriction and post-discharge dietary fibre intake on recovery from acute uncomplicated diverticulitis. 2018. Abstract from The Gold Coast Health Research Week 2018, Gold Coast, Australia.