Inequality of crime

Kathleen Daly, RA Lincoln

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingOther chapter contributionResearchpeer-review

Abstract

[Extract] the relationship between crime and inequality is central to criminology. each chapter in this text acknowledges that power and powerlessness, advantage and disadvantage, social structures and hierarchies play significant roles in shaping criminal law, society and individual behaviour. This chapter explores these themes by canvassing seven major propositions on relationship between crime and inequality, moving from the societal level to the individual criminal act. We then turn to the image that criminologists have of inequality and the ways they explain the disproportionate presence of disadvantaged people in the criminal justice system. This image, which we term the familiar analysis of inequality, focuses on class, and to the lesser extent, on race/ethnicity and age.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCrime and justice
Subtitle of host publicationAn Australian textbook in criminology
EditorsAndrew Goldsmith, Mark Israel, Kathleen Daly
Place of PublicationSydney
PublisherLawbook Co.
Pages105-120
Number of pages15
Edition2nd
ISBN (Print)0455218315
Publication statusPublished - 2003

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offense
criminology
criminal law
role play
social structure
ethnicity
justice
Society

Cite this

Daly, K., & Lincoln, RA. (2003). Inequality of crime. In A. Goldsmith, M. Israel, & K. Daly (Eds.), Crime and justice: An Australian textbook in criminology (2nd ed., pp. 105-120). Sydney: Lawbook Co..
Daly, Kathleen ; Lincoln, RA. / Inequality of crime. Crime and justice: An Australian textbook in criminology. editor / Andrew Goldsmith ; Mark Israel ; Kathleen Daly. 2nd. ed. Sydney : Lawbook Co., 2003. pp. 105-120
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Daly, K & Lincoln, RA 2003, Inequality of crime. in A Goldsmith, M Israel & K Daly (eds), Crime and justice: An Australian textbook in criminology. 2nd edn, Lawbook Co., Sydney, pp. 105-120.

Inequality of crime. / Daly, Kathleen; Lincoln, RA.

Crime and justice: An Australian textbook in criminology. ed. / Andrew Goldsmith; Mark Israel; Kathleen Daly. 2nd. ed. Sydney : Lawbook Co., 2003. p. 105-120.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingOther chapter contributionResearchpeer-review

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Daly K, Lincoln RA. Inequality of crime. In Goldsmith A, Israel M, Daly K, editors, Crime and justice: An Australian textbook in criminology. 2nd ed. Sydney: Lawbook Co. 2003. p. 105-120