Improving childhood immunisation coverage rates. Evaluation of a divisional program

Hammad Ali, Nicholas Zwar, Jo Wild

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In contrast to generally high childhood immunisation coverage rates across Australia, general practices in central Sydney (New South Wales) have a below average coverage rate. To address this, Central Sydney GP Network undertook a project that involved visiting practices with less than 90% coverage and provided guidance and support to increase coverage. Methods: The intervention was evaluated using quantitative and qualitative methods. The quantitative component analysed practice coverage rate data from the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register. The qualitative component included semistructured interviews with general practitioners and practice staff. Results: Quantitative analysis showed that rates for a number of practices with initial coverage between 80-90% increased to more than 90% during the intervention. The qualitative component highlighted patient and practice related issues around coverage and reporting. Discussion: Many practice related coverage and reporting issues were identified; the majority are modifiable and thus practices can be targeted to improve coverage. However, some patient related issues are complex and not easily addressed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)833-835
Number of pages3
JournalAustralian Family Physician
Volume38
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2009
Externally publishedYes

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General Practice
Immunization
New South Wales
General Practitioners
Interviews

Cite this

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Improving childhood immunisation coverage rates. Evaluation of a divisional program. / Ali, Hammad; Zwar, Nicholas; Wild, Jo.

In: Australian Family Physician, Vol. 38, No. 10, 01.10.2009, p. 833-835.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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