Improved language performance subsequent to low-frequency rTMS in patients with chronic non-fluent aphasia post-stroke

Caroline H S Barwood, Bruce E. Murdoch, B. M. Whelan, David Lloyd, Stephan Riek, J. D. O' Sullivan, A. Coulthard, A. Wong

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Abstract

Background: Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has emerged as a potential tool for neurorehabilitation and remediation of language in chronic non-fluent aphasia post-stroke. Inhibitory (1Hz) rTMS has been applied to homologous language sites to facilitate behavioural language changes. Improvements in picture-naming performance and speech output over time have been reported. Methods: Low-frequency (1Hz) rTMS was applied to six real stimulation and six sham placebo patients for 20min per day, for 10days, and behavioural language outcome measures were taken at baseline (pre-stimulation) and 2months post-stimulation. Results: The findings demonstrate treatment-related changes observed in the stimulation group when compared to the placebo control group at 2months post-stimulation on naming performance as well as other aspects of expressive language and auditory comprehension. Conclusions: These findings provide considerable evidence to support the theory of rTMS modulating mechanisms of transcallosal disinhibition in the aphasic brain and highlight the potential clinical applications for language rehabilitation post-stroke. Click for the corresponding questions to this CME article.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)935-943
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Neurology
Volume18
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Aphasia
Language
Stroke
Placebos
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Control Groups
Brain

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Barwood, C. H. S., Murdoch, B. E., Whelan, B. M., Lloyd, D., Riek, S., O' Sullivan, J. D., ... Wong, A. (2011). Improved language performance subsequent to low-frequency rTMS in patients with chronic non-fluent aphasia post-stroke. European Journal of Neurology, 18(7), 935-943. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-1331.2010.03284.x
Barwood, Caroline H S ; Murdoch, Bruce E. ; Whelan, B. M. ; Lloyd, David ; Riek, Stephan ; O' Sullivan, J. D. ; Coulthard, A. ; Wong, A. / Improved language performance subsequent to low-frequency rTMS in patients with chronic non-fluent aphasia post-stroke. In: European Journal of Neurology. 2011 ; Vol. 18, No. 7. pp. 935-943.
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Barwood, CHS, Murdoch, BE, Whelan, BM, Lloyd, D, Riek, S, O' Sullivan, JD, Coulthard, A & Wong, A 2011, 'Improved language performance subsequent to low-frequency rTMS in patients with chronic non-fluent aphasia post-stroke' European Journal of Neurology, vol. 18, no. 7, pp. 935-943. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-1331.2010.03284.x

Improved language performance subsequent to low-frequency rTMS in patients with chronic non-fluent aphasia post-stroke. / Barwood, Caroline H S; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Whelan, B. M.; Lloyd, David; Riek, Stephan; O' Sullivan, J. D.; Coulthard, A.; Wong, A.

In: European Journal of Neurology, Vol. 18, No. 7, 07.2011, p. 935-943.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Murdoch, Bruce E.

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AU - Lloyd, David

AU - Riek, Stephan

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AU - Coulthard, A.

AU - Wong, A.

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