Implementing Team-Based Learning (TBL) in Accounting Courses

Jacqueline Christensen, Jennifer Harrison, Janice Hollindale, Kayleen Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Accounting education has been criticised for ill-equipping graduates for professional employment, with calls for accounting students to acquire a broader range of skills. Working in teams is an important employability skill, yet students generally have negative perceptions of group work. This paper describes a different approach to group work, team-based learning (TBL). Students of introductory accounting courses were organised into permanent strategic teams and worked on multiple team activities. We examined their perceptions of TBL as a key pedagogical component of their learning activities. Compared to a control sample, our findings suggest that the TBL experience improved some attitudes, particularly among quantitatively inclined students. After experiencing TBL, students believed their teamwork abilities had improved, particularly those related to cultural diversity. Students generally believed that their ability in performing the roles of task leader, socio-emotional leader, and information provider improved significantly, as did their preferences for performing the two leadership roles.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)195-219
Number of pages25
JournalAccounting Education
Volume28
Issue number2
Early online date16 Oct 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Mar 2019

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learning
student
group work
leader
employability
ability
teamwork
cultural diversity
graduate
leadership
education
experience
Leadership roles
Team work
Emotion
Employability
Cultural diversity
Accounting education
Student learning
Work teams

Cite this

Christensen, Jacqueline ; Harrison, Jennifer ; Hollindale, Janice ; Wood, Kayleen. / Implementing Team-Based Learning (TBL) in Accounting Courses. In: Accounting Education. 2019 ; Vol. 28, No. 2. pp. 195-219.
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Implementing Team-Based Learning (TBL) in Accounting Courses. / Christensen, Jacqueline; Harrison, Jennifer; Hollindale, Janice; Wood, Kayleen.

In: Accounting Education, Vol. 28, No. 2, 04.03.2019, p. 195-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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