Implementing evidence in practice: Do action lists work?

Martin Haley, Aimee Lettis, Philippa M. Rose, Lucy S C Jenkins, Paul Glasziou, Peter W. Rose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

What is already known in this area: • Although action lists are commonly used in medical education, very little is known about their effectiveness. WHAT THIS WORK ADDS: • Delegates attending a course designed to update primary healthcare professionals in evidence-based practice recorded an average of 4.7 actions of which 41% were completed or on target after 6 months. • Greater success was achieved by those who put time aside to complete the work, gave it sufficient priority and had resources available to complete the action. • This research establishes that success factors relevant in business are also key factors in medicine. SUGGESTIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH: • Using these findings, resources should be developed and tested to improve implementation of actions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107-114
Number of pages8
JournalEducation for Primary Care
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2012

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Evidence-Based Practice
Medical Education
Primary Health Care
Medicine
Research

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Haley, M., Lettis, A., Rose, P. M., Jenkins, L. S. C., Glasziou, P., & Rose, P. W. (2012). Implementing evidence in practice: Do action lists work? Education for Primary Care, 23(2), 107-114. https://doi.org/10.1080/14739879.2012.11494085
Haley, Martin ; Lettis, Aimee ; Rose, Philippa M. ; Jenkins, Lucy S C ; Glasziou, Paul ; Rose, Peter W. / Implementing evidence in practice : Do action lists work?. In: Education for Primary Care. 2012 ; Vol. 23, No. 2. pp. 107-114.
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Haley, M, Lettis, A, Rose, PM, Jenkins, LSC, Glasziou, P & Rose, PW 2012, 'Implementing evidence in practice: Do action lists work?' Education for Primary Care, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 107-114. https://doi.org/10.1080/14739879.2012.11494085

Implementing evidence in practice : Do action lists work? / Haley, Martin; Lettis, Aimee; Rose, Philippa M.; Jenkins, Lucy S C; Glasziou, Paul; Rose, Peter W.

In: Education for Primary Care, Vol. 23, No. 2, 03.2012, p. 107-114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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