Impaired working-memory after cerebellar infarcts paralleled by changes in BOLD signal of a cortico-cerebellar circuit

B Ziemus, O Baumann, R Luerding, R Schlosser, G Schuierer, U Bogdahn, M W Greenlee

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Abstract

A considerable body of evidence supports the notion that cerebellar lesions lead to neuropsychological deficits, including impairments in working-memory, executive tasks and verbal fluency. Studies employing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and anatomical tracing in primates provide evidence for a cortico-cerebellar circuitry as the functional substrate of working-memory. The present fMRI study explores the activation pattern during an n-back working-memory task in patients with an isolated cerebellar infarct. To determine each patient's cognitive impairment, neuropsychological tests of working-memory and attention were carried out. We conducted fMRI in nine patients and nine healthy age-matched controls while they performed a 2-back task in a blocked-design. In both groups we found bilateral activations in a widespread cortico-cerebellar network, consisting of the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 44, 45), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 9, 46), parietal cortex (BA 7, 40), pre-supplementary motor area (BA 6) anterior cingulate (BA 32). Relative to healthy controls, patients with isolated cerebellar infarcts demonstrated significantly more pronounced BOLD-activations in the precuneus and the angular gyrus during the 2-back task. The significant increase in activation in the posterior parietal areas of the cerebellar patients could be attributed to a compensatory recruitment to maintain task performance. We conclude that cerebellar lesions affect remote cortical regions that are part of a putative cortico-cerebellar network.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2016-2024
Number of pages9
JournalNeuropsychologia
Volume45
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 May 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Short-Term Memory
Parietal Lobe
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Prefrontal Cortex
Neuropsychological Tests
Gyrus Cinguli
Motor Cortex
Task Performance and Analysis
Primates

Cite this

Ziemus, B ; Baumann, O ; Luerding, R ; Schlosser, R ; Schuierer, G ; Bogdahn, U ; Greenlee, M W. / Impaired working-memory after cerebellar infarcts paralleled by changes in BOLD signal of a cortico-cerebellar circuit. In: Neuropsychologia. 2007 ; Vol. 45, No. 9. pp. 2016-2024.
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Impaired working-memory after cerebellar infarcts paralleled by changes in BOLD signal of a cortico-cerebellar circuit. / Ziemus, B; Baumann, O; Luerding, R; Schlosser, R; Schuierer, G; Bogdahn, U; Greenlee, M W.

In: Neuropsychologia, Vol. 45, No. 9, 15.05.2007, p. 2016-2024.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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