Impact of urban development on aquatic macroinvertebrates in south eastern Australia: Degradation of in-stream habitats and comparison with non-urban streams

Peter J. Davies, Ian A. Wright, Sophia J. Findlay, Olof J. Jonasson, Shelley Burgin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Internationally, waterways within urban areas are subject to broad-scale environmental impairment from urban land uses. In this study, we used in-stream macroinvertebrates as surrogates to measure the aquatic health of urban streams in the established suburbs of northern Sydney, in temperate south eastern Australia. We compared these with samples collected from streams flowing in adjacent naturally vegetated catchments. Macroinvertebrates were collected over a 30-month period from riffle, edge and pool rock habitats and were identified to the family level. Macroinvertebrate assemblages were assessed against the influence of imperviousness and other catchment and water quality variables. The study revealed that urban streams were significantly impaired compared with those that flowed through naturally vegetated non-urban catchments. Urban streams had consistently lower family richness, and sensitive guilds were rare or missing. We found that variation in community assemblages among the in-stream habitats (pool edges, riffles and pool rocks) were more pronounced within streams in naturally vegetated catchments than in urban waterways.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)685-700
Number of pages16
JournalAquatic Ecology
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Urban Renewal
South Australia
aquatic invertebrates
urban development
macroinvertebrate
Ecosystem
Urban Health
degradation
Water Quality
habitat
habitats
macroinvertebrates
catchment
rock pool
waterways
riffle
rocks
comparison
guild
urban areas

Cite this

Davies, Peter J. ; Wright, Ian A. ; Findlay, Sophia J. ; Jonasson, Olof J. ; Burgin, Shelley. / Impact of urban development on aquatic macroinvertebrates in south eastern Australia : Degradation of in-stream habitats and comparison with non-urban streams. In: Aquatic Ecology. 2010 ; Vol. 44, No. 4. pp. 685-700.
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Impact of urban development on aquatic macroinvertebrates in south eastern Australia : Degradation of in-stream habitats and comparison with non-urban streams. / Davies, Peter J.; Wright, Ian A.; Findlay, Sophia J.; Jonasson, Olof J.; Burgin, Shelley.

In: Aquatic Ecology, Vol. 44, No. 4, 12.2010, p. 685-700.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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