Ignoring the Call for Law Reform: Is It Time to Expand the Scope of Protection for Personal Images Uploaded on Social Networks?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Social networks have changed the way in which people communicate, in particular the way that images are uploaded and shared online. While there are many benefits for the use of social networks, uploading personal images online are prone to misuse. This is highlighted with the Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica privacy breach, however the protection of personal images is limited and fragmented in Australia. There have been a number of calls for potential law reform for expanding the scope of legal protection under the common law however the law remains unchanged. This means that personal images that fall outside the scope of the current protection are bereft of protection and prone to misuse. This article examines whether the common law ought to be expanded to prevent the abuse of images that may not fall within the scope of a sensitive nature.
Original languageEnglish
Article number3
Pages (from-to)166-177
Number of pages11
JournalTort Law Review
Volume26
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2019

Fingerprint

law reform
social network
common law
legal protection
facebook
privacy
abuse
time
Law

Cite this

@article{495076cdf82d4c3585385af4449ef976,
title = "Ignoring the Call for Law Reform:: Is It Time to Expand the Scope of Protection for Personal Images Uploaded on Social Networks?",
abstract = "Social networks have changed the way in which people communicate, in particular the way that images are uploaded and shared online. While there are many benefits for the use of social networks, uploading personal images online are prone to misuse. This is highlighted with the Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica privacy breach, however the protection of personal images is limited and fragmented in Australia. There have been a number of calls for potential law reform for expanding the scope of legal protection under the common law however the law remains unchanged. This means that personal images that fall outside the scope of the current protection are bereft of protection and prone to misuse. This article examines whether the common law ought to be expanded to prevent the abuse of images that may not fall within the scope of a sensitive nature.",
author = "Eugenia Georgiades",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "166--177",
journal = "Tort Law Review",
issn = "1039-3285",
publisher = "Thomson Reuters (Prous Science)",
number = "3",

}

Ignoring the Call for Law Reform: Is It Time to Expand the Scope of Protection for Personal Images Uploaded on Social Networks? . / Georgiades, Eugenia.

In: Tort Law Review, Vol. 26, No. 3, 3, 07.2019, p. 166-177.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ignoring the Call for Law Reform:

T2 - Is It Time to Expand the Scope of Protection for Personal Images Uploaded on Social Networks?

AU - Georgiades, Eugenia

PY - 2019/7

Y1 - 2019/7

N2 - Social networks have changed the way in which people communicate, in particular the way that images are uploaded and shared online. While there are many benefits for the use of social networks, uploading personal images online are prone to misuse. This is highlighted with the Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica privacy breach, however the protection of personal images is limited and fragmented in Australia. There have been a number of calls for potential law reform for expanding the scope of legal protection under the common law however the law remains unchanged. This means that personal images that fall outside the scope of the current protection are bereft of protection and prone to misuse. This article examines whether the common law ought to be expanded to prevent the abuse of images that may not fall within the scope of a sensitive nature.

AB - Social networks have changed the way in which people communicate, in particular the way that images are uploaded and shared online. While there are many benefits for the use of social networks, uploading personal images online are prone to misuse. This is highlighted with the Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica privacy breach, however the protection of personal images is limited and fragmented in Australia. There have been a number of calls for potential law reform for expanding the scope of legal protection under the common law however the law remains unchanged. This means that personal images that fall outside the scope of the current protection are bereft of protection and prone to misuse. This article examines whether the common law ought to be expanded to prevent the abuse of images that may not fall within the scope of a sensitive nature.

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 166

EP - 177

JO - Tort Law Review

JF - Tort Law Review

SN - 1039-3285

IS - 3

M1 - 3

ER -