Human Rights and Everyday Justice: Harmony in the Mirror

Florentina Benga

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

This paper argues that as the concept of law should mirror the notions of
culture, values and self, so human rights must be reflected in ‘everyday
justice’ and not simply in the formal law of the state if they are to be
meaningful. It does so by drawing on philosophical discussions on natural
law with reference to the concept of law as examined by the community as
a whole, on the one hand, and legal professionals, on the other hand. The
paper specifically refers to the right to education and the right to justice
from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, three levels of justice
(formal, informal and everyday), and their association with traditional and
contemporary legal education.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2018
EventThe 2018 Australasian Society of Legal Philosophy Annual Conference - Bond University, Gold Coast, Australia
Duration: 6 Jul 20188 Jul 2018
https://www.aslp.org.au/conference

Conference

ConferenceThe 2018 Australasian Society of Legal Philosophy Annual Conference
CountryAustralia
CityGold Coast
Period6/07/188/07/18
Internet address

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human rights
justice
Law
education
community
Values

Cite this

Benga, F. (2018). Human Rights and Everyday Justice: Harmony in the Mirror. Abstract from The 2018 Australasian Society of Legal Philosophy Annual Conference, Gold Coast, Australia.
Benga, Florentina. / Human Rights and Everyday Justice: Harmony in the Mirror. Abstract from The 2018 Australasian Society of Legal Philosophy Annual Conference, Gold Coast, Australia.
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abstract = "This paper argues that as the concept of law should mirror the notions ofculture, values and self, so human rights must be reflected in ‘everydayjustice’ and not simply in the formal law of the state if they are to bemeaningful. It does so by drawing on philosophical discussions on naturallaw with reference to the concept of law as examined by the community asa whole, on the one hand, and legal professionals, on the other hand. Thepaper specifically refers to the right to education and the right to justicefrom the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, three levels of justice(formal, informal and everyday), and their association with traditional andcontemporary legal education.",
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note = "The 2018 Australasian Society of Legal Philosophy Annual Conference ; Conference date: 06-07-2018 Through 08-07-2018",
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Benga, F 2018, 'Human Rights and Everyday Justice: Harmony in the Mirror' The 2018 Australasian Society of Legal Philosophy Annual Conference, Gold Coast, Australia, 6/07/18 - 8/07/18, .

Human Rights and Everyday Justice: Harmony in the Mirror. / Benga, Florentina.

2018. Abstract from The 2018 Australasian Society of Legal Philosophy Annual Conference, Gold Coast, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

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Benga F. Human Rights and Everyday Justice: Harmony in the Mirror. 2018. Abstract from The 2018 Australasian Society of Legal Philosophy Annual Conference, Gold Coast, Australia.