How prepared are students for the various transitions in their medical studies? An Australian university pilot study

Christian Moro, Anne Spooner (Group Author), Michelle McLean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearch

Abstract

Becoming a doctor involves a series of transitions that require medical students to be equipped with the appropriate knowledge, skills, confidence and professional approach at each step. This pilot cross-sectional study canvassed five cohorts immediately after completing Years 1-5 in a five-year undergraduate medical program (Gold Coast, Australia) regarding their preparedness for the next year. The survey, an amalgamation of two validated inventories, was tailored for each year group to include the expected competencies in five areas. Despite a low response, those who did participate provided valuable information regarding their competence and confidence in terms of their interpersonal and intrapersonal skills, their clinical skills, their ability to apply their theoretical knowledge and investigations. Time management and balancing work and their studies were some areas in which support might be needed. Generally, all student felt comfortable with the communication and physical examination skills but up to half of some of the more senior students were not confident towards dealing with a violent patient and about 20% did not feel at ease communicating and assessing a patient with a mental health issue. Students identified two other areas that requiring curriculum interventions: Working with patients who might be using non-allopathic medications and calculating drug doses. As both impact on patient outcomes, a follow-up study is required. Different recruitment strategies need to be investigated.
Original languageEnglish
Article number25
Number of pages14
JournalMedEdPublish
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Feb 2019

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Students
Time Management
Ghana
Aptitude
Clinical Competence
Medical Students
Curriculum
Mental Competency
Physical Examination
Mental Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Communication
Equipment and Supplies
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Social Skills
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

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abstract = "Becoming a doctor involves a series of transitions that require medical students to be equipped with the appropriate knowledge, skills, confidence and professional approach at each step. This pilot cross-sectional study canvassed five cohorts immediately after completing Years 1-5 in a five-year undergraduate medical program (Gold Coast, Australia) regarding their preparedness for the next year. The survey, an amalgamation of two validated inventories, was tailored for each year group to include the expected competencies in five areas. Despite a low response, those who did participate provided valuable information regarding their competence and confidence in terms of their interpersonal and intrapersonal skills, their clinical skills, their ability to apply their theoretical knowledge and investigations. Time management and balancing work and their studies were some areas in which support might be needed. Generally, all student felt comfortable with the communication and physical examination skills but up to half of some of the more senior students were not confident towards dealing with a violent patient and about 20{\%} did not feel at ease communicating and assessing a patient with a mental health issue. Students identified two other areas that requiring curriculum interventions: Working with patients who might be using non-allopathic medications and calculating drug doses. As both impact on patient outcomes, a follow-up study is required. Different recruitment strategies need to be investigated.",
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How prepared are students for the various transitions in their medical studies? An Australian university pilot study. / Moro, Christian; Spooner, Anne (Group Author); McLean, Michelle .

In: MedEdPublish, Vol. 8, No. 1, 25, 08.02.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearch

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