How many pictures should your print ad have?

Rafi M M I Chowdhury, G. Douglas Olsen, John W. Pracejus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the impact of increasing the number of images in a print advertisement on affective and cognitive responses. In advertisements with both positive and negative pictures, increasing the number of positive (negative) images increases positive (negative) affect. However, consistent with theory regarding the mechanism underpinning affect integration in a simultaneous presentation context, in advertisements with only positive or only negative images, increasing the number of positive (negative) images of similar affective intensity does not increase positive (negative) affect. For both types of advertisements, additional pictures have no effects on attitude toward the ad when they exemplify a product attribute or benefit that an existing picture(s) already depicts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-6
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Business Research
Volume64
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

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Negative affect
Attitude toward the ad
Product attributes

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Chowdhury, Rafi M M I ; Olsen, G. Douglas ; Pracejus, John W. / How many pictures should your print ad have?. In: Journal of Business Research. 2011 ; Vol. 64, No. 1. pp. 3-6.
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How many pictures should your print ad have? / Chowdhury, Rafi M M I; Olsen, G. Douglas; Pracejus, John W.

In: Journal of Business Research, Vol. 64, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 3-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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