How effective are treatments other than antibiotics for acute sore throat?

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To estimate the benefits of treatments other than antibiotics for acute sore throat, and the differences between non-antibiotic interventions and controls in patient-perceived pain of sore throat, a systematic review of controlled trials in Medline and the Cochrane Library was carried out. Sixty-six randomised controlled trials (with or without additional antibiotics) were identified and 17 met the selection criteria. Twenty-two non-antibiotic managements for sore throat were compared. Their efficacy relative to placebo ranged from no effect to 93%. Some non-antibiotic treatments may be more effective than antibiotics; however, publication bias may have exaggerated the benefits. These treatments should be investigated further with respect to efficacy, safety, and side-effects as potential firstline management options for acute sore throat.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)817-820
Number of pages4
JournalBritish Journal of General Practice
Volume50
Issue number459
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2000
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

@article{025a259bfec64cdeaf8cbf25ea48baed,
title = "How effective are treatments other than antibiotics for acute sore throat?",
abstract = "To estimate the benefits of treatments other than antibiotics for acute sore throat, and the differences between non-antibiotic interventions and controls in patient-perceived pain of sore throat, a systematic review of controlled trials in Medline and the Cochrane Library was carried out. Sixty-six randomised controlled trials (with or without additional antibiotics) were identified and 17 met the selection criteria. Twenty-two non-antibiotic managements for sore throat were compared. Their efficacy relative to placebo ranged from no effect to 93{\%}. Some non-antibiotic treatments may be more effective than antibiotics; however, publication bias may have exaggerated the benefits. These treatments should be investigated further with respect to efficacy, safety, and side-effects as potential firstline management options for acute sore throat.",
author = "M Thomas and {Del Mar}, C and P Glasziou",
year = "2000",
month = "10",
language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "817--820",
journal = "Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners",
issn = "0960-1643",
publisher = "ROYAL COLL GENERAL PRACTITIONERS",
number = "459",

}

How effective are treatments other than antibiotics for acute sore throat? / Thomas, M; Del Mar, C; Glasziou, P.

In: British Journal of General Practice, Vol. 50, No. 459, 10.2000, p. 817-820.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - How effective are treatments other than antibiotics for acute sore throat?

AU - Thomas, M

AU - Del Mar, C

AU - Glasziou, P

PY - 2000/10

Y1 - 2000/10

N2 - To estimate the benefits of treatments other than antibiotics for acute sore throat, and the differences between non-antibiotic interventions and controls in patient-perceived pain of sore throat, a systematic review of controlled trials in Medline and the Cochrane Library was carried out. Sixty-six randomised controlled trials (with or without additional antibiotics) were identified and 17 met the selection criteria. Twenty-two non-antibiotic managements for sore throat were compared. Their efficacy relative to placebo ranged from no effect to 93%. Some non-antibiotic treatments may be more effective than antibiotics; however, publication bias may have exaggerated the benefits. These treatments should be investigated further with respect to efficacy, safety, and side-effects as potential firstline management options for acute sore throat.

AB - To estimate the benefits of treatments other than antibiotics for acute sore throat, and the differences between non-antibiotic interventions and controls in patient-perceived pain of sore throat, a systematic review of controlled trials in Medline and the Cochrane Library was carried out. Sixty-six randomised controlled trials (with or without additional antibiotics) were identified and 17 met the selection criteria. Twenty-two non-antibiotic managements for sore throat were compared. Their efficacy relative to placebo ranged from no effect to 93%. Some non-antibiotic treatments may be more effective than antibiotics; however, publication bias may have exaggerated the benefits. These treatments should be investigated further with respect to efficacy, safety, and side-effects as potential firstline management options for acute sore throat.

M3 - Review article

VL - 50

SP - 817

EP - 820

JO - Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners

JF - Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners

SN - 0960-1643

IS - 459

ER -