How coaches use strongman implements in strength and conditioning practice

Paul Winwood, John Cronin, Justin Keogh, Mike Dudson, Nicholas Gill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
48 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This article describes how strongman implements, which we defined as "any non-traditional implement integrated into strength and conditioning practice" are currently utilised by coaches to enhance athletic performance. Coaches (mean ±SD 34.0 ±8.2 y old, 9.8 ±6.7 y general strength and conditioning coaching experience) completed a self-reported 4-page survey. The subject group included coaches of amateur (n = 74), semi-professional (n = 38) and professional (n = 108) athletes. Eighty-eight percent (n = 193) of coaches reported using strongman implements in the training of their athletes. Coaches ranked sleds, ropes, kettlebells, tyres, sandbags and farmers walk bars as the top six implements used, and anaerobic/metabolic conditioning, explosive strength/power and muscle endurance as the three main physiological reasons for its use. The strongman implements were typically used in combination with traditional exercises in a gymnasium-based setting. Future research needs to evaluate the performance benefits of such training practices in controlled studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1107-1125
Number of pages19
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Science and Coaching
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2014

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Winwood, Paul ; Cronin, John ; Keogh, Justin ; Dudson, Mike ; Gill, Nicholas. / How coaches use strongman implements in strength and conditioning practice. In: International Journal of Sports Science and Coaching. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 5. pp. 1107-1125.
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How coaches use strongman implements in strength and conditioning practice. / Winwood, Paul; Cronin, John; Keogh, Justin; Dudson, Mike; Gill, Nicholas.

In: International Journal of Sports Science and Coaching, Vol. 9, No. 5, 01.10.2014, p. 1107-1125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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