How can we prepare better for influenza epidemics?

Chris Del Mar, Peter J. Collignon

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Public health physicians and clinicians keep a wary eye out for influenza epidemics, bearing in mind the greatest pandemic at the end of the first world war, when tens of millions died. The epidemics come every year, but their severity varies. Normally influenza is simply one of many clinically indistinguishable influenza-like illnesses (ILIs) from which people recover uneventfully. Australia’s latest season was worse than most, with a record number of laboratory confirmed cases (170 000), although better availability of molecular tests may account for much of the rise, as visits for ILIs have risen only slightly above the annual average.2 The northern hemisphere is now bracing for its turn.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)j5007
JournalBMJ (Clinical research ed.)
Volume2017
Issue number359
Publication statusPublished - 2 Nov 2017

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Human Influenza
World War I
Pandemics
Public Health
Physicians

Cite this

Del Mar, Chris ; Collignon, Peter J. / How can we prepare better for influenza epidemics?. In: BMJ (Clinical research ed.). 2017 ; Vol. 2017, No. 359. pp. j5007.
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Del Mar, C & Collignon, PJ 2017, 'How can we prepare better for influenza epidemics?' BMJ (Clinical research ed.), vol. 2017, no. 359, pp. j5007.

How can we prepare better for influenza epidemics? / Del Mar, Chris; Collignon, Peter J.

In: BMJ (Clinical research ed.), Vol. 2017, No. 359, 02.11.2017, p. j5007.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearchpeer-review

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AU - Collignon, Peter J.

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N2 - Public health physicians and clinicians keep a wary eye out for influenza epidemics, bearing in mind the greatest pandemic at the end of the first world war, when tens of millions died. The epidemics come every year, but their severity varies. Normally influenza is simply one of many clinically indistinguishable influenza-like illnesses (ILIs) from which people recover uneventfully. Australia’s latest season was worse than most, with a record number of laboratory confirmed cases (170 000), although better availability of molecular tests may account for much of the rise, as visits for ILIs have risen only slightly above the annual average.2 The northern hemisphere is now bracing for its turn.

AB - Public health physicians and clinicians keep a wary eye out for influenza epidemics, bearing in mind the greatest pandemic at the end of the first world war, when tens of millions died. The epidemics come every year, but their severity varies. Normally influenza is simply one of many clinically indistinguishable influenza-like illnesses (ILIs) from which people recover uneventfully. Australia’s latest season was worse than most, with a record number of laboratory confirmed cases (170 000), although better availability of molecular tests may account for much of the rise, as visits for ILIs have risen only slightly above the annual average.2 The northern hemisphere is now bracing for its turn.

M3 - Comment/debate

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SP - j5007

JO - BMJ (Clinical research ed.)

JF - BMJ (Clinical research ed.)

SN - 0959-535X

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